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Top Iranian official: 'There will not be a military confrontation' with U.S.

Top Iranian official: 'There will not be a military confrontation' with U.S. The Trump administration appeared to escalate tensions with Tehran two days earlier by announcing the deployment of 1,000 additional troops to the Middle East.


Huge great white shark surprises stunned New Jersey fishermen

Huge great white shark surprises stunned New Jersey fishermen A party of fishermen about 30 miles southeast of the Manasquan Inlet got a shocking visitor: a huge great white shark.


New study to examine feeding habits of Cape Cod great whites

New study to examine feeding habits of Cape Cod great whites Researchers on Cape Cod are launching a new study focused on the hunting and feeding habits of the region's great white sharks following last year's two attacks on humans, including the state's first fatal one in more than 80 years. The hope is that the work, which starts in the coming days, contributes critical information to the ongoing debate over how to keep Cape beachgoers safe, said state marine biologist Greg Skomal, who has been studying the region's great whites for years and is leading the new effort. Cape Cod officials have been wrestling with how to respond to public concern in the aftermath of last year's attacks.


Xiaomi Eyes $725 Million Expansion to Stave Off Huawei in China

Xiaomi Eyes $725 Million Expansion to Stave Off Huawei in China (Bloomberg) -- Xiaomi Corp. aims to spend an additional 5 billion yuan ($725 million) expanding its Chinese retail network over the next three years, anticipating a re-doubled effort by Huawei Technologies Co. to grow its domestic market share.The smartphone maker will spend the money on expanding distribution channels and on reward programs for its partners and sales employees, a person familiar with the matter said, citing an internal meeting convened by billionaire co-founder Lei Jun Tuesday. That spending comes on top of an existing budget for building up its retail operations. Chinese media outlet Caixin reported on the investment earlier.Huawei is said to be preparing for a drop in international smartphone shipments of 40% to 60% as the Trump administration bars its access to American components and software. That means Google will cut off popular apps like YouTube and stop providing updates for the Android system that powers all of Huawei’s devices abroad. It wants to grab as much as half of the smartphone market in China in 2019 to offset that decline overseas, people familiar with the matter have said, citing internal discussions about year-end goals. It hopes to get there also by investing in marketing and expanding distribution channels.Xiaomi aims to become the country’s top vendor but its priority is to at least become No. 3, the person said, asking not to be identified discussing internal goals. The company currently ranks fourth. It sees the roll-out of next-generation 5G mobile networks in coming years as a golden opportunity to boost sales on its home turf, the person added.Hong Kong-listed Xiaomi now commands about 12% of the Chinese smartphone market versus Huawei’s 34%, Canalys estimates. Its shipments slid 13% in the first quarter while its rivals’ soared 41%, the research outfit estimated.To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Gao Yuan in Beijing at ygao199@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Peter Elstrom at pelstrom@bloomberg.net, Edwin Chan, Colum MurphyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


New Jersey man confirmed dead at Dominican Republic resort

New Jersey man confirmed dead at Dominican Republic resort Joseph Allen, 55, of Avenel, was found unresponsive in his room at the TerraLinda Resort in Sosua, his family said


Watch as a Model 3 is transformed into the first Tesla pickup truck

Watch as a Model 3 is transformed into the first Tesla pickup truck For all of the hoopla surrounding Elon Musk's online antics and Tesla's ongoing struggles to ramp up Model 3 production, it's easy to overlook just how far the company has come in a relatively short period of time. In less than seven years time, Tesla managed to roll out the award-winning Model S, followed of course by the Model Y and the Model 3. It's worth noting that Tesla, during this seven-year period, has seen its deliveries and overall manufacturing figures skyrocket. As a prime example, Tesla during the first quarter of 2018 manufactured 34,494 vehicles. During the first quarter of 2019, just one year later, that figure jumped to 77,100 vehicles. All the while, Tesla has no plans of slowing down. Over the next few years, the company has plans to release a crossover version of the Model 3, a Tesla semi-truck, a next-gen Roadster, and last but not least, an electric pickup truck. Tesla's pickup truck plan is particularly intriguing given how popular pickup trucks are in the United States. Over the past few months, Musk has teased Tesla's somewhat mysterious pickup truck, noting that it will boast "incredible functionally from a load carrying standpoint" and that it will look more like a sci-fi truck than a traditional pickup truck. "That means that it’s not going to be for everyone," Musk said a few weeks ago, "like if somebody just wants to have a truck that looks like trucks have looked like for the last 20 to 40 years, it probably isn’t for them." With no definite timeline regarding a release date, or even an unveiling, an enterprising Model 3 owner and robotics enthusiast named Simone Giertz recently decided that she couldn't wait for Tesla to get around to releasing a pickup truck. So instead, she created one on her own out of a Model 3. The entire process was documented on YouTube and it's quite fascinating. "I don't know if this going to be the smartest or the most stupid thing I'm ever gonna do, but the bottom line is  I really want an electric pickup truck and more specifically I want a Tesla pickup," Giertz explains. Suffice it to say, the entire process was quite involved and not exactly straight forward. But after a lot of engineering and planning, the first Tesla pickup truck was borne into existence. It's not the most aesthetically pleasing design, but it's still quite an impressive achievement: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jKv_N0IDS2A She even went so far as to make a commercial for the fictional "Truckla" she designed: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R35gWBtLCYg


Authorities Seize 16 Tons of Cocaine From a Ship Docked in Philadelphia, in One of the Largest Drug Busts in U.S. History

Authorities Seize 16 Tons of Cocaine From a Ship Docked in Philadelphia, in One of the Largest Drug Busts in U.S. History Federal officials estimate the street value at over $1 billion


The Latest: Alex Jones sanctioned in Sandy Hook lawsuit

The Latest: Alex Jones sanctioned in Sandy Hook lawsuit A Connecticut judge has imposed sanctions on conspiracy theorist Alex Jones for an outburst on his web show against a lawyer for relatives of victims of the Sandy Hook School shooting. Judge Barbara Bellis on Tuesday ordered the Infowars host to pay some of the relatives' legal fees and prohibited him from filing motions to dismiss their defamation lawsuit against him. The families of several of the 20 children and six educators killed in the 2012 shooting are suing Jones, Infowars and others for promoting a theory that the massacre was a hoax.


Boeing may rebrand the 737 Max so people are willing to fly in it again

Boeing may rebrand the 737 Max so people are willing to fly in it again Boeing has a serious problem on its hands. After a pair of fatal crashes that claimed hundreds of lives, the company's 737 Max jetliner has been seriously tarnished. Nobody really wants to fly on the planes, even if Boeing can figure out how to keep them from killing people, and that means the hundreds of planes sitting around in storage right now may have a tough road ahead.Now, Boeing says it might have a plan for dealing with the complete loss of public trust in the 737 Max line, and it could be as simple as just changing its name. As Bloomberg reports, Boeing CFO Greg Smith noted the possibility of a name change in an interview during the Paris Air Show this week."I'd say we're being open-minded to all the input we get," Smith reportedly said. "We're committed to doing what we need to do to restore it. If that means changing the brand to restore it, then we'll address that. If it doesn't, we'll address whatever is a high priority."Boeing followed up the interview with an official statement in which it reiterated its desire to make the plane, you know, not crash. The company also said it had "no plans" to change the name of the 737 Max at the moment, but it's also worth noting that the planes are still grounded, so a name change probably wouldn't do them any good, yet.The first order of business for Boeing is obviously fixing whatever is wrong with its jets. Reports following the second fatal crash suggested that flight software which was designed to avoid a stall may have been to blame for sending both planes plummeting to the Earth, but details have been hard to come by in the months since those reports surfaced.It'll be interesting to see how Boeing handles things once its planes are inevitably cleared to fly once more. Will travelers simply forget the history of the Max line, or ignore it? If not, a name change might be one way to get butts in the seats again.


Facebook Unveils Cryptocurrency Despite Privacy Concerns

Facebook Unveils Cryptocurrency Despite Privacy Concerns Facebook reveals plans for digital currency to allow billions of users to transfer money with close to zero transaction fees.


The Latest: Indiana AG's office plans vigorous defense

The Latest: Indiana AG's office plans vigorous defense The Indiana attorney general's office says it will vigorously defend him against a federal lawsuit by four women who say he drunkenly groped them during a party last year. The lawsuit filed Tuesday alleges sexual harassment by Republican state Attorney General Curtis Hill on a state lawmaker and three legislative staffers in March 2018 at an Indianapolis bar. Hill has denied wrongdoing and rebuffed calls from Republican Gov. Eric Holcomb to resign.


Man catfished an Alaska teen and convinced her to kill for $9M, police say

Man catfished an Alaska teen and convinced her to kill for $9M, police say Police said an Indiana man posed as a millionaire online, established a relationship with a teen in Alaska and convinced the girl to kill her friend.


Ex-ICE officials criticize Trump's tweet about upcoming deportation sweep

Ex-ICE officials criticize Trump's tweet about upcoming deportation sweep President Trump issued a public warning Monday night, by tweet, of a mass deportation effort by Immigration and Customs Enforcement to start next week. His tweet prompted sharp criticism from some former ICE officials.


Trump's pick for defense secretary withdraws as past domestic incidents surface

Trump's pick for defense secretary withdraws as past domestic incidents surface President Trump announced that acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan has withdrawn from consideration to be his permanent defense chief as reports surfaced about a messy divorce that involved a violent incident.


Boeing's troubled 737 MAX gets huge vote of confidence from IAG

Boeing's troubled 737 MAX gets huge vote of confidence from IAG US aircraft giant Boeing got a welcome vote of confidence in its beleaguered 737 MAX plane on Tuesday when International Airlines Group, owner of British Airways, said it wanted to buy 200 of the planes. It was a coup for Boeing since up to now IAG has been a longtime client of Airbus for its single-aisle jets, used on some of its most popular routes. "We have every confidence in Boeing and expect that the aircraft will make a successful return to service in the coming months having received approval from the regulators," IAG's chief Willie Walsh said in a statement.


Reynolds Wrap will pay someone $5,000 a week to travel across America eating ribs

Reynolds Wrap will pay someone $5,000 a week to travel across America eating ribs Grill masters and backyard barbecue bosses, listen up


IRGC chief says Iran's ballistic missiles capable of hitting 'carriers in the sea'

IRGC chief says Iran's ballistic missiles capable of hitting 'carriers in the sea' The commander of Iran's elite Revolutionary Guards Corps said on Tuesday that Iran's ballistic missiles were capable of hitting "carriers in the sea" with great precision. "These missiles can hit with great precision carriers in the sea ... These missiles are domestically produced and are difficult to intercept and hit with other missiles," Brigadier General Hossein Salami said in a televised speech.


Saudi, Philippines airlines order Airbus, IAG goes for Boeing

Saudi, Philippines airlines order Airbus, IAG goes for Boeing Saudi Arabian Airlines, the kingdom's national airline, said Tuesday it had ordered 65 A320neo-type aircraft from Airbus, worth more than $7.4 billion at list prices, giving an early boost to the European manufacturer at the Paris Air Show. The deal is part of Saudi Arabian Airlines' plans to boost its A320neo fleet to up to 100 aircraft from 35 now. The additional aircraft will be deployed to support the national carrier's plan to boost capacity," Airbus said in a statement.


American dies in Dominican Republic after undergoing liposuction

American dies in Dominican Republic after undergoing liposuction A New York man died in the Dominican Republic last Tuesday after traveling tothe Caribbean country to undergo plastic surgery


China earthquake kills 13, injures 199

China earthquake kills 13, injures 199 The toll from a strong 6.0-magnitude earthquake in southwest China rose to 13 dead and 199 injured on Tuesday as rescuers pulled bodies and survivors from wrecked buildings. More than 8,000 people were relocated as a large number of structures were damaged or collapsed after the quake struck late Monday near Yibin, in Sichuan province, according to the city government. Other images were of a woman being helped out of another collapsed structure.


How U.S. Allies in the Middle East are Responding to Rising Tensions with Iran

How U.S. Allies in the Middle East are Responding to Rising Tensions with Iran The impact of escalation is likely to be most acute in the Gulf region


Venezuela's misery doesn't even spare the dead in Maracaibo

Venezuela's misery doesn't even spare the dead in Maracaibo Thieves have broken into some of the vaults and coffins in El Cuadrado cemetery since late last year, stealing ornaments and sometimes items from corpses as the country sinks to new depths of deprivation. "Starting eight months ago, they even took the gold teeth of the dead," said José Antonio Ferrer, who is in charge of the cemetery, where a prominent doctor, a university director and other local luminaries are buried. Much of Venezuela is in a state of decay and abandonment, brought on by shortages of things that people need the most: cash, food, water, medicine, power, gasoline.


The migrants risking it all on the deadly Rio Grande

The migrants risking it all on the deadly Rio Grande The 19-year-old pregnant migrant wades towards the US shore, deep enough in the Rio Grande for waves to splash against her waist. Pushing through the river’s current, and mindful of an alligator lingering upriver, she guides her friend’s crying 10-year-old boy towards a US border-patrol rescue boat. As the boat carries them on the final leg of their journey to the United States from Honduras, the young woman waves back to a group on Mexico’s riverbank cheering her rescue.The day before, border-patrol agents at the Eagle Pass river crossing in South Texas had found the body of a man too decomposed to be easily identified. A couple of days earlier, a video of a man desperately trying to swim against the current before going limp and sinking circulated in Mexican news media. And in early May, border-patrol agents at Eagle Pass pulled the body of a 10-month-old baby from the Rio Grande after a raft carrying nine migrants overturned. Only five survived.“The sad moments are the deaths. Unfortunately, we’ve seen some of those,” says Bryan Kemmett, the border-patrol agent in charge of Eagle Pass, a town of 29,000 about an hour from the larger Del Rio. “The more troubling ones, the ones more recently, are the small infants. When you see the small infant and you hear the infant dying, you think about your own children.”Migrants have for years traversed the Rio Grande on makeshift rafts to cross illegally into the United States. But facing a surge of families from Central America, border-patrol agents are now pulling dozens of migrants, including young children, from the harsh current of the river almost every day. President Donald Trump’s repeated threats and attempts to limit immigration have not deterred migrants. The US Customs and Border Protection agency took more than 144,200 into custody in May, the highest monthly total in 13 years.Policies that separated migrant children from their parents, forced asylum seekers to wait in Mexico for their day in court and detained teenagers in camps likened to juvenile prisons have done little to stem the immigration flow. So far in the current federal fiscal year, which began on 1 October, border-patrol agents have rescued at least 315 migrants from a 209-mile stretch of the Rio Grande – up from 12 migrants the year before.Earlier this month, a 40-year-old migrant woman collapsed at the Eagle Pass station about 30 minutes after crossing the river. She was declared dead at a hospital, and the authorities were investigating the cause of her death.Migrants who are interviewed for this article at Eagle Pass say they are well aware of the risks. But they also say they were convinced by human smugglers and by other migrants that crossing the Rio Grande, which can take about five to 10 minutes, was the fastest and least complicated way to start their requests for asylum, given the Trump administration’s clampdown at legal ports of entry.“The whole world crosses through the river,” says Yevy Leiva, 28, who steered a raft across the Rio Grande with his son and two other migrants. Nine days later, he waits in a shelter in Del Rio, packed with scores of other migrants, for a bus to Dallas to stay with friends. Only migrants who show visible distress or who are travelling with a child are rescued by border-patrol agents. And while far more migrants trying to slip into the United States die on land – from dehydration or other dangers in the desert and brush – the number of deaths in the Rio Grande is rising at an alarming rate.Over the past two fiscal years, at least 11 people have drowned in the Del Rio sector of the Rio Grande. By comparison, the border patrol recovered the remains of four people from the river from fiscal 2015 to fiscal 2017.Randy Davis, the acting deputy chief patrol agent of the border patrol for the Del Rio sector, blames the deluge of migrants on the human smugglers who are increasingly exploiting this stretch of the Rio Grande as a comparatively untapped path into the United States.Since 1 October, border-patrol agents in the Del Rio sector have arrested nearly 18,000 migrant family members – compared with 1,387 during the first eight months of fiscal 2018. Agents in the sector have also rescued nearly three times as many migrants in the water than agents in other sectors along the border with Mexico, taken together.Some of them were infants who had to be flown to a hospital in San Antonio after they nearly drowned, Kemmett says. Davis says he expects to find more bodies. “There have been hundreds and hundreds of rescues,” Davis says. “I’m trying to keep them all straight in my mind. I would suspect there are other individuals out there that were never reported missing that we will eventually recover at some point in the future.”The US border patrol has issued warnings in Mexico about the dangers of crossing the Rio Grande, and Kemmett says migrants have been urged to at least wear life jackets before making the attempt. He says the river’s levels have risen about 3ft because of a water release from a nearby hydroelectric dam and excessive rainfall. While the Rio Grande is shallow in some areas, other parts dip without warning to a depth of 8ft. Debris ricochets along the riverbed, and the banks are littered with inflatable tubes and Styrofoam noodles that migrants use to stay afloat.The river levels are expected to rise again soon and the dam releases to irrigate crops in and around Eagle Pass and to provide electricity for the town. Underscoring the dangers to the migrants, an alligator hid among river weeds one afternoon last month, floating just high enough to show the spikes along its back.“They’re navigating the currents, they’re navigating the river itself, and now you have alligators,” says Kemmett, a 24-year veteran of the border patrol. “An alligator is not going to know the difference between a child and a chicken, or any other small animal.” Migrants often head to the Rio Grande with one change of clothes as well as their identification and other documents in a plastic bag. After crossing successfully, some change into the dry clothes before they are taken to a border-patrol facility to be processed.> They’re navigating the currents, they’re navigating the river itself, and now you have alligatorsWalking along the riverbank in Eagle Pass, Kemmett stops to examine a shirt left in the weeds near the water. It belonged to a baby. “We’re seeing a lot of families,” he says. “But within those families, we’re seeing more and more younger infants. Trying to cross the river with a 2-month-old strapped to your chest or your back is not easy.”“It’s not easy to begin with,” Kemmett says, “but now you’re trying to hold on to your child. And the desperation and the panic gets in there, and then they start to struggle.” Once they cross the Rio Grande and touch US soil, the migrants are taken into custody by the border patrol. They are processed in centres that were built to detain migrants before they were deported.But the sheer number of incoming migrants – many of whom are seeking asylum and are travelling with children who, by US law, cannot be detained for more than 20 days – has created an overwhelming backlog in cases and crowding at the border processing facilities. As a result, the vast majority of migrants who illegally enter the United States are told to report to court at a later date and are released. From there, the migrants search out relatives or other places to stay while their cases wind their way through immigration court.Last month, the Trump administration began flying migrants from overcrowded centres elsewhere in the Rio Grande Valley in Texas to Del Rio to be processed. But agents in Del Rio say the processing facility there was also overcapacity; earlier this month, the authorities there built a tent city to house migrants. Storage areas that had been used for border-patrol equipment in Del Rio “are now storing baby formula, diapers, additional extra space for blankets, heat blankets they can wrap up in”, Davis says. Most of the migrants who are caught by the border patrol come to the United States to escape poverty in their home nations, Kemmett says, and do not appear to be the criminals that Trump has warned of in his campaign to limit immigration. Agents in Del Rio say there is no sign that the surge of migrant families will decline.Kemmett says the border-patrol agents he oversees are becoming “battle fatigued”. He also questions why migrants would knowingly put their children in that type of danger in attempting the perilous journey to the United States.For some of the immigrants, it is the only way to protect their families. Barefoot and balancing his 8-year-old daughter on his shoulders, Angel Gabriel, 39, crosses the Rio Grande and into Eagle Pass on a hot afternoon.He steadies his 32-year-old wife as they walk into the river current; she tightly grips their barefoot 16-year-old son. Border-patrol agents meet the family in the middle of the river and bring them to land. As soon as agents finish patting down Gabriel to ensure he is not carrying weapons or drugs, he rushes to his family members and embraces them. All four of them weep.“Truly thankful,” Gabriel says through tears as he sits in a border-patrol van with his family. He says they left Honduras after being attacked. “Thankful to the power of the United States that they helped us get out,” Gabriel says. “I feel thankful that my family is OK.”A few hours earlier, a pregnant Honduran woman took her first steps on US soil. She had briefly reconsidered crossing the Rio Grande after seeing pictures on Facebook a day earlier of an alligator in the river. But turning her head, she revealed a bruised jaw – the evidence of what she said was an attack by her domestic partner in Honduras.The woman, who said she was to give birth in about a week, wanted to apply for asylum in the United States and hoped to create a good life for her soon-to-be-born son. “The life with my partner was a risk,” she said as she looked at the river. “So this is nothing compared to that.”© New York Times


Qatar sends technical experts to Israel, eyeing new Gaza power line

Qatar sends technical experts to Israel, eyeing new Gaza power line GAZA/JERUSALEM (Reuters) - A Qatari technical delegation held talks in Israel and the Gaza Strip this week about helping pay for a proposed new power line between them, officials on both sides said on Tuesday, marking a potential expansion of Doha's aid efforts for Palestinians. Qatar has in recent years funneled hundreds of millions of dollars into relief projects in Hamas-controlled Gaza, which it views as helping stave off privation and fighting with Israel. The intervention is approved by Israel but has gone largely unacknowledged by rightist Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who, along with U.S.-allied Arab leaders, has cold-shouldered Doha for its ties to Iran and Islamist groups like Hamas.


Venezuela receives second shipment of Red Cross aid

Venezuela receives second shipment of Red Cross aid Venezuela Monday received a second shipment of Red Cross humanitarian aid, including 24 tonnes of medical supplies and generators provided by Panama, intended for hospitals to help address the country's acute health crisis. In a statement, the Venezuelan Red Cross said it had received "medicines, medical supplies and power generators" that will be distributed in hospitals across the country, which is experiencing the worst crisis in its recent history. Six trucks moved the supplies to a Red Cross warehouse in Caracas, an AFP journalist confirmed.


This Tank Could Stop a Chinese Invasion of Taiwan

This Tank Could Stop a Chinese Invasion of Taiwan The Trump administration’s plan to sell tanks, missiles and ground-launched air defenses to Taiwan embodies what might be called a strategic paradigm shift to empower the small island’s deterrence posture against an often-threatened Chinese invasion.While much existing discussion centers upon strengthening Taiwanese air, sea and undersea defenses, there also appears to be an unequivocal need for major land defenses. The existing air-sea emphasis is extremely important, yet there are certainly elements of this approach which invite further discussion about the need to provide Taiwan with a strong, armored ground force as well.The proposed $2 billion arms package includes 108 main battle tanks, 250 Stinger anti-air missiles, as well as 409 Javelins and 1,240 TOW anti-tank missiles.Drawing heavily upon a US Pacific presence along with Asian-theater allied support, a maritime-air Taiwan defense strategy has clearly had a deterrence impact in recent years. Part of this ability to keep a Chinese invasion at bay has naturally hinged upon a strong US posture ensuring defense of the island.


The secret to Elizabeth Warren's surge? Ideas

The secret to Elizabeth Warren's surge? Ideas Of all the Democratic candidates, Warren has offered by far the most plans-driven and ambitious campaign – and voters love it‘Rather than condescend to voters, like most politicians, Warren has treated voters as adults, smart enough to handle her wonky style of campaigning.’ Photograph: Mark Makela/Getty ImagesOn Friday, the Massachusetts senator Elizabeth Warren co-sponsored a bill to impose mandatory fines on companies that have data breaches. It was the kind of consumer welfare legislation that in the past would have been unremarkable. But in an era when Congress has consistently shirked its duty to shield consumers, the bill stood out.The legislation capped a week in which Warren surged in the polls. Less than eight months before the Iowa caucus, Warren is making strides in 2020 primary polls. According to an NBC News/Wall Street Journal survey of 1,000 adults, 64% of Democratic primary voters in June were enthusiastic or comfortable with Warren, compared with 57% in March. Fewer of these voters were enthusiastic or comfortable with Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders, who have lost 11 and six points, respectively, since March.There’s more. In a poll last week of 2,312 registered voters in South Carolina, Warren gained nine points to reach 17% compared to Biden’s 37%. Among 18-34 year olds, Warren is leading 24% to Sanders’ 19% and Biden’s 17%.> There’s a simple reason for Warren’s sudden rise in the polls: the public has an appetite for policyThere’s a simple reason for Warren’s sudden rise in the polls: the public has an appetite for policy. Of all the Democratic candidates, Warren’s campaign has been by far the most ideas-driven and ambitious in its policy proposals. And voters love it.Rather than condescend to voters, like most politicians, Warren has treated voters as adults, smart enough to handle her wonky style of campaigning. Instead of spoon-feeding prospective voters soundbites, Warren is giving them heaps to digest – and her polling surge shows that voters appreciate the nerdy policy talk.Indeed, since Warren declared her candidacy for president, she has been offering policy prescriptions for our country’s most pressing ailments – and she hasn’t been brainstorming in a bubble.Week in and week out, she has been crisscrossing the country to tell receptive voters her ideas for an ultra-millionaire tax, student debt cancellation and breaking up big tech. She has also weighed in on reproductive rights, vaccines, the opioid crisis and algorithmic discrimination in automated loans. Her bevy of white papers demonstrates that there isn’t a policy area Warren won’t touch and she isn’t worried about repelling anyone with hard-hitting proposals.Better than any other candidate, Warren has articulated a connection between her personal and professional struggles and her ideas, lending an air of authenticity to her campaign. Her backstory – teacher turned reluctant stay-at-home mom turned Harvard Law School professor – clearly resonates with voters in important states such as Iowa and South Carolina.That sense of reciprocity has turned Warren into a populist rock star. Instead of appealing to the lowest common denominator among the voting public, she’s listening to and learning from voters in an ideas-driven campaign that doesn’t take voters for granted.The strategy is paying off – and proving wrong the outdated political wisdom that Americans don’t care about the intricacies of government.In May, Warren traveled to Kermit, West Virginia, the heart of Trump country, to pitch a $2.7bn-a-year plan to combat opioid addiction.“Her stance is decisive and bold,” Nathan Casian-Lakes told CBS News. “She has research and resources to back her ideas.” * Jill Priluck’s reporting and analysis has appeared in the New Yorker, Slate, Reuters and elsewhere


Forget Glock or Sig Sauer: This 100 Year Old Gun Might Be Better

Forget Glock or Sig Sauer: This 100 Year Old Gun Might Be Better The response of some weapons designers might have been to develop a fully automatic gun. If one bullet wouldn’t stop the enemy, three might. That would be the argument of a disposable, consumerist culture of overabundance, but we weren’t there yet. The 1911 was frugal with the bullets, but the ones it dished out really did the job.The 1911 is one of the most notorious handguns in history and easily the most famous in America, having seen action in every U.S. conflict since World War I. One of the most successful product designs ever, the 1911 has achieved something rare in the world of machines: immortality. Over a hundred years old, it remains largely unchanged.What Apple is to consumer electronics, John Browning was to late 19th and early 20th century firearms. The 1911 is his most famous design. The typical 1911 is 8.25 inches from tip to tail and weighs 2.49 pounds empty — about as much as a trade paperback book. The 1911 is made of steel, steel and more steel, and takes a magazine that holds seven bullets.The 1911 has seen service in World War I, Mexico, Haiti, Nicaragua, the Dominican Republic (twice), Lebanon, World War II, the Korean War, Vietnam, Iran, Grenada, Panama, the Gulf War, the Iraq War and Afghanistan. It has chased bad men from Pancho Villa to Osama Bin Laden.


Duterte Stands by China, Doubts Own Fishermen in Sea Collision

Duterte Stands by China, Doubts Own Fishermen in Sea Collision (Bloomberg) -- Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte is standing by China over a collision involving the two nations’ boats in the South China Sea, with his spokesman casting doubts on local fishermen’s accounts of the incident.In his first public statement about what he described as a “maritime incident,” Duterte said China’s side should be heard on the collision that resulted in a Philippine vessel carrying 22 fishermen sinking in disputed waters on June 9. The crew were rescued by a Vietnamese fishing boat and a Philippine Navy ship.“It is best investigated. I don’t issue a statement now because there’s no investigation and no result," Duterte said in speech at a Philippine Navy event on Monday night. "The only thing we can do is wait and give the other party the right to be heard.”The Philippines will not escalate tensions with China by sending military ships to the South China Sea following the collision, he added, reiterating his nation isn’t ready to go to war with Beijing.At a briefing Tuesday, Duterte’s spokesman Salvador Panelo said there are "circumstances that give doubt to the version" of the Filipino fishermen, including how most of them were asleep when the collision happened.“The President doesn’t want this to be blown into an international crisis,” Panelo said. “We are being careful because there will be repercussions if we make the wrong move.”‘Passive’ PolicyDuterte stuck to his pro-China stance despite calls from the opposition, led by Vice President Leni Robredo, to change his “passive” China policy by actively asserting the nation’s rights in the disputed waters. Robredo, in a Facebook post Sunday, also called on Duterte’s government to demand the Chinese fishermen’s trial in the Philippines.Duterte now has to convince the public that friendly ties with China is still the way to go, said Jay Batongbacal, director of the University of the Philippines’ Institute for Maritime Affairs and Law of the Sea.“Between the Philippine government and the Chinese government the friendship policy has been set, but this incident has happened and casts doubt on the sincerity and wisdom of it to the Filipino people,” Batongbacal said.The Philippines’ long-term position in the South China Sea dispute may be weakened if Duterte maintains his pro-Beijing stance after the incident, said Professor Jeffrey Ordaniel, a fellow at Hawaii-based foreign policy research institute Pacific Forum. “The Duterte administration’s China policy is unfortunately helping the Chinese pursue their maritime ambitions.”Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Lu Kang described the incident as an “accidental collision" at briefing on Monday, adding that politicizing the collision “is not appropriate.” Beijing’s embassy in Manila earlier said the Chinese vessel’s captain tried to rescue the Philippine fishermen after bumping into their boat, but was afraid of being "besieged" by other Filipino fishing boats.The incident took place near Reed Bank, an area claimed by both Manila and Beijing where there’s a pending oil exploration plan by Philippines company PXP Energy Corp.\--With assistance from Dandan Li and Philip J. Heijmans.To contact the reporter on this story: Andreo Calonzo in Manila at acalonzo1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Cecilia Yap at cyap19@bloomberg.net, Ruth Pollard, Caroline AlexanderFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Waves of Chinese tourists invade North Korea

Waves of Chinese tourists invade North Korea Decades later, the monument is a regular stop for new waves of Chinese going to the North, this time as tourists. Hundreds of soldiers and workers have been sprucing up the obelisk and its grounds in recent days ahead of a state visit to Pyongyang by Chinese President Xi Jinping this week. An inscription on it lauds "the Chinese People's Volunteer Army, who fought with us on this land and smashed down the common enemy".


Attorney: Officer attacked without warning in Costco

Attorney: Officer attacked without warning in Costco The off-duty officer who shot and killed a man inside a Southern California Costco last week was attacked without warning as he held his toddler son, the policeman's attorney said Monday. Attorney David Winslow said his client — a Los Angeles Police Department officer whom he wouldn't name — was struck from behind without a word being spoken Friday night as he fed his son samples of teriyaki chicken in the warehouse store in Corona, southeast of Los Angeles. The officer shot and killed French, 32, of Riverside, and critically wounded French's parents.


Russia's 1st 5th Generation Stealth Fighter: Meet the Secret MiG 1.44

Russia's 1st 5th Generation Stealth Fighter: Meet the Secret MiG 1.44 Over the prior decade, Russia’s foray into fifth-generation jet fighter development has become synonymous with the upcoming Su-57. But the Su-57 was only Russia’s second attempt at developing a fifth-generation aircraft, preceded by several decades with an altogether different project.This is the story of the ill-fated MiG 1.44.In 1979, Soviet high command determined that a new generation of fighter aircraft was needed to ensure the competitiveness of the Soviet Air Force (VVS) into the 1990’s and beyond. The timing could not have been more apt; it was only several years later that the US air force began researching and developing what would become the highly capable F-22 fighter.The project, which became known as MFI or “Multifunctional Frontline Fighter,” established a set of core design criteria roughly corresponding with the Soviet and early Russian understanding of what makes a fifth-generation fighter: supermaneuverability, supercruise capability (sustained supersonic speeds without the use of afterburners), low radar cross-section, integrated avionics system, and substantially improved landing/takeoff capability.


Mexico's crackdown on migrants sends some heading south

Mexico's crackdown on migrants sends some heading south Mexico's efforts to slow Central American migration across its territory showed some bite Monday as some people turned around to head south in the face of increased enforcement, while government officials said they would target human smuggling rings. One government official announced that the 6,000 National Guard members who officials had repeatedly said would be sent to the southern border will actually be distributed across the northern border and other areas as well, while another suggested measures were showing results. A senior Mexican official, who requested anonymity to discuss negotiations with the U.S., said that three weeks ago about 4,200 migrants were arriving at the U.S. border daily and that now that number has dropped to about 2,600 per day.


Why are we headed for a blowup with Iran? It began when Trump scrapped the nuclear deal

Why are we headed for a blowup with Iran? It began when Trump scrapped the nuclear deal At minimum, Iran and America need a hotline to deconflict their military forces and avert a serious escalation. But that has been rejected before.


Gunman dead, 2 injured in second California Costco shooting in three days

Gunman dead, 2 injured in second California Costco shooting in three days A gunman shot two people in a Costco parking lot Monday afternoon in Southern California before turning his weapon on himself.


Accidental cat filter turns press conference live stream into a meme

Accidental cat filter turns press conference live stream into a meme In something of a ridiculous and yet lighthearted story, a Pakistani politician's press briefing with journalists recently became comedic fodder after a cat filter was applied to the faces of individuals being recorded via Facebook live. The incident, which was attributed to human error, showcased regional minister Shaukat Yousafzai -- and others -- with cat ears and whiskers while talking about otherwise serious topics.The cat filter was live for a few minutes before someone noticed it and promptly removed it. But for a few glorious minutes last Friday, viewers were witness to an event seemingly lifted out of a kids-version of Black Mirror.The Guardian reports:> It was several minutes before organisers realised that the minister had acquired pointy ears. When one of his moustached party colleagues began to speak, looking earnest and holding a pen, he too was transformed into a cat.> > Party followers watching online immediately started making jokes at the expense of Pakistan's provincial Khyber Pakhtunkhwa government. They offered up a whole series of feline puns.Hardly a surprise, folks on Twitter had a field day with the minor debacle. And truth be told, using photo filters during all political events might actually persuade more people to become politically active.https://twitter.com/nailainayat/status/1139583166115540992All told, it's been interesting to see how quickly filters have evolved. Back during the early days of Instagram, for example, photo filters were relatively straight forward and simply involved adding some nice tonal effects to photos. These days, with Snapchat leading the way, photo and video filters have transformed dramatically. Today, filters have become incredibly quirky and now exist across a multitude of social networking sites and apps.


Death toll from China quakes rises to 11

Death toll from China quakes rises to 11 BEIJING/SHANGHAI, June 18 (Reuters) - The death toll from two strong earthquakes in China rose to 11 on Tuesday, with 122 people injured, state media said, adding that rescuers pulled some survivors from rubble in a part of the country that often suffers strong tremors. The quakes, roughly 30 minutes apart, hit the southwestern province of Sichuan late on Monday, with shaking felt in key regional cities, such as the provincial capital of Chengdu and the metropolis of Chongqing. People rushed into the streets and cracks were left in some buildings by the quakes, pictures posted on the social media accounts of state media showed.


Shanahan's confirmation hearing for defense secretary delayed amid FBI investigation

Shanahan's confirmation hearing for defense secretary delayed amid FBI investigation Patrick Shanahan is facing a protracted FBI investigation that has delayed his Senate hearing until at least next month. With Shanahan’s confirmation on hold, press reports have questioned his relationship with the president, and the Pentagon has been fielding press queries about his personal life.


Alex Jones Faces Court Action After Threatening Sandy Hook Lawyer

Alex Jones Faces Court Action After Threatening Sandy Hook Lawyer Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via GettyA Connecticut judge could impose penalties on InfoWars conspiracy theorist Alex Jones on Tuesday, after Jones aired a show where he punched a picture of an attorney representing Sandy Hook families and called the lawyer a “pimp.”In a motion filed Monday in Connecticut, attorneys for the Sandy Hook families asked the court to review Friday’s episode of InfoWars. In that show, Jones raged at attorney Chris Mattei, who’s representing Sandy Hook families suing Jones for saying the 2012 elementary school massacre never happened.While sitting next to his own attorney, Norm Pattis, Jones accused Mattei without evidence of planting child porn on InfoWars’s servers.“Total war!” Jones said. “You want it, you got it! I’m not into kids like your Democratic Party, you cocksuckers! So get ready!”Alex Jones Offers $1M Reward After Alleged ‘Malware’ Attack That He Says Planted Child Porn on His ServersWhile producing emails during the lawsuit’s discovery process, InfoWars accidentally handed over child pornography that had been emailed to the company by one or more anonymous people. The emails were then sent to a company handling document review for the Sandy Hook attorneys, the latest error in a discovery process that InfoWars and Jones have been frequently accused of hindering.  After receiving the images, the Sandy Hook attorneys contacted the FBI, who took over the document review process. In their motion, the attorneys say InfoWars could have avoided forwarding the emails if they had conducted “even minimal due diligence.” “They transmitted images to the plaintiffs that if they were knowingly possessed is a serious federal crime,” the attorneys say in the motion. In a statement, Pattis said InfoWars employees hadn’t opened the emails when they were originally received. “I spoke to federal prosecutors last week,” Pattis said. “They report that there is no indication anyone at InfoWars knowingly possessed child pornography. The items were embedded in emails sent to folks at InfoWars without ever having been opened.”On his Friday show, Jones concocted a conspiracy theory that Mattei had planted the child porn himself in an attempt to discredit InfoWars. Jones fumed at Mattei, calling him a “white-shoe boy that thinks he owns America.” Twitter Permanently Bans Alex Jones and InfowarsPattis appeared uncomfortable as Jones raged at the plaintiff’s attorney, at one point urging Jones to calm down and referring to Jones as “young man.” At one point during the show, Jones punched a picture of Mattei. Pattis told Jones to stop showing Mattei’s face on air, adding that they didn’t know who had sent InfoWars the child pornography.“I didn’t come on your show to be made out to be a naive fool,” Pattis said. The Sandy Hook attorneys urged the judge in the case to consider action against Jones over the show at a hearing on Tuesday. They haven’t specified yet what kind of action they want, but say in their motion that the court has an “obligation to protect” the lawyers on the case. Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Harvard Rescinds Acceptance of Pro-Gun Parkland Survivor Over Past Racist Comments

Harvard Rescinds Acceptance of Pro-Gun Parkland Survivor Over Past Racist Comments Kashuv writes that he was embarrassed of the comments he made and that they were "not indicative of who I am or who I've become in the years since."