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Defense Department Password Is Cracked in 9 Seconds. So How Safe Are US Weapons?

Defense Department Password Is Cracked in 9 Seconds. So How Safe Are US Weapons? The weapons systems being developed by the U.S. Department of Defense are vulnerable to cyberattacks, meaning some evildoer with hacking skills could potentially take control of such weapons without being noticed, according to a new report by the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO), released Oct. 9. And the DOD seemed oblivious to the threats: Even though tests conducted by the DOD itself have shown such vulnerabilities, department officials told the GAO that they "believed their systems were secure and discounted some test results as unrealistic," according to the report, which is based on an analysis of DOD cybersecurity tests, policies and guidelines, as well as DOD interviews.


Baby Names Show Enormous Gender Gap

Baby Names Show Enormous Gender Gap Overwhelmingly, boys get names associated with power, strength and rage, like "Savage" or "Dash." Girls get names associated with joy and beauty, like "Lilac" and "Jubilee." The findings come from a new analysis of newly emerging names by Laura Wattenberg, who runs the naming blog BabyNameWizard. "It would be reasonable to expect that new names, entering a more egalitarian society, would be more balanced" in their gendered expectations, Wattenberg told Live Science. Wattenberg focused only on "new" word names, or names that appeared in the Social Security Administration database of American babies in 2017, but that were given to fewer than 50 babies in the century prior.


What Made Leonardo da Vinci Such a Great Artist? 'Crossed Eyes' May Have Helped

What Made Leonardo da Vinci Such a Great Artist? 'Crossed Eyes' May Have Helped Leonardo da Vinci may have literally seen the world differently. The famed Renaissance artist may have had an eye condition that helped him better-depict the 3D world on a flat surface when drawing and painting, a new report suggests. The report, which analyzed six works of art that are likely portraits or self-portraits of Leonardo, suggests that the artist may have had strabismus, or crossed eyes, a condition in which a person's eyes don't look in the same direction at the same time.


Mercury mission to explore origin of Solar System

Mercury mission to explore origin of Solar System Is Mercury's core liquid or solid, and why -- on the smallest planet in our solar system -- is it so big? What can the planet closest to the Sun tell us about how our solar system came into being? An unmanned European-Japanese space mission, dubbed BepiColombo, blasted off early Saturday morning from French Guiana, to probe these and other mysteries.


Why police believe ex-boyfriend was not connected to woman's murder: Part 3

Why police believe ex-boyfriend was not connected to woman's murder: Part 3 Adam Harvey was eliminated as a suspect by investigators, who say he had an alibi and no gun residue on his hands.


11-year-old arrested for his pregnant soon-to-be stepmother's murder: Part 1

11-year-old arrested for his pregnant soon-to-be stepmother's murder: Part 1 Twenty-six-year-old Kenzie Houk had been shot in the back of the head, and police charged Jordan Brown, the son of Houk's fiancÃ?(c), for her murder.


An Anonymous Group Spent $330,000 on Facebook Ads Urging Brits to Reject Brexit Deal

An Anonymous Group Spent $330,000 on Facebook Ads Urging Brits to Reject Brexit Deal The Mainstream Network is the latest group to have been linked to ‘dark ads’ - anonymous advertisements targeted at specific users


This absurd parody proves that all TED Talks really do sound the same

This absurd parody proves that all TED Talks really do sound the same It's not just you: A lot of TED Talks sound the same. Comedian and writer Keaton Patti — who imagined what a White House press briefing written by a bot might sound like — just shared a new imagined bot script, this time parodying the language of lofty TED Talks. SEE ALSO: Burger King's AI-written ads are beautiful disasters The "visibly clothed" TED TALKER opens the bizarrely inspirational lecture — given in a "place where you can talk" — with an anecdote about his or her grandfather, who was "paid for for being old."  "He told me there's just enough plastic in the ocean for someone to marry," the TED TALKER states. "But we're almost out of time." The audience doesn't care much about the actual TED Talk, but are insistent that they be shown graphs. I forced a bot to watch over 1,000 hours of TED Talks and then asked it to write a TED Talk of its own. Here is the first page. pic.twitter.com/FpGz25q9zc — Keaton Patti (@KeatonPatti) October 18, 2018 "The crowd likes the graph since it is a graph and they like graphs for the reasons they have," the script reads. Honestly, how relatable.  When the plastic from the ocean breaks into the room, the crowd "waits to see if it this will somehow turn into a graph."  Patti even mocked up a very scientific graph for our enjoyment. Look at this if you want to live. pic.twitter.com/XBUEgTSmX4 — Keaton Patti (@KeatonPatti) October 18, 2018 Patti jokes that bots write these scripts after watching 1,000 hours of content. While they're actually just delightful parodies, people really love them. I'm disturbed by just how compelling this was...if it was a book, I would have kept reading straight through and the scary part is that I'm not sure why.... — Vagobond🍍🏄🏽🤙 (@vagobond) October 18, 2018 me trying to meet my word requirement on an essay pic.twitter.com/UZ1R9a5V7H — rhêtorík (@djrhetorik) October 18, 2018 Even the official TED Talks account found it "truly inspiring."  Truly inspiring. https://t.co/ROcM0ECA5W — TED Talks (@TEDTalks) October 18, 2018 WATCH: What's up with the Razer Phone 2? — Technically Speaking


Scientists prepare for expedition to the world's deepest depths

Scientists prepare for expedition to the world's deepest depths For the first time, humans will visit the deepest part of each of the five oceans, plunging to the sea floor using a two-person craft designed to withstand the intense pressures more than 5.5 miles (9 km) below the surface. The project, known as Five Deeps Expedition, will use a special submersible vehicle that took more than three years to build. It is made of titanium and other special materials that can dive to the bottom of the ocean, said Victor Vescovo, an explorer who will pilot the vehicle after it leaves its supporting boat and descends toward the deepest parts of the ocean.


Skull of ancient human found in burned Brazilian museum

Skull of ancient human found in burned Brazilian museum The skull, though damaged, was protected by a cabinet that fell over the glass box it was encased in, the museum's deputy director Cristiana Serejo said. Luzia was the star of a collection of 20 million items in the 200-year-old building that also contained Egyptian artifacts, archeological finds and historical memorabilia. A fire last month destroyed the vast majority of the collection and triggered an outcry about how Brazil's cultural institutions have deteriorated during an era of a weak economy and deep austerity measures.


A $215 Million Settlement Proposed in Alleged USC Gynecologist Abuse

A $215 Million Settlement Proposed in Alleged USC Gynecologist Abuse About 500 current and former students have now made accusations against Tyndall


Somali Refugee Says Dunkin' Employee Called Police Because She Talked in Her Native Language

Somali Refugee Says Dunkin' Employee Called Police Because She Talked in Her Native Language "She was like, 'You can leave, or I'm calling the cops'"


An Alliance of Plants and Fungus Could Be the Key to Farming in Space

An Alliance of Plants and Fungus Could Be the Key to Farming in Space One crucial plant hormone could help make eggplants in space a reality.


Farmers Know Trump's Trade War Is Hurting Them. That Doesn't Mean They'll Vote Democrat

Farmers Know Trump's Trade War Is Hurting Them. That Doesn't Mean They'll Vote Democrat Democrats have attack President Donald Trump over his trade war and the harm it's doing to farmers. That doesn't mean farmers will vote Democrat.


Chicago Police Say Foul Play Is Suspected in the Disappearance of a Pregnant 26-Year-Old Postal Worker

Chicago Police Say Foul Play Is Suspected in the Disappearance of a Pregnant 26-Year-Old Postal Worker Surveillance footage of Coles on Oct. 2 shows her dressed in her work clothes not far from her home just hours before she was reported missing.


Carrots could be key to making greener buildings, say researchers

Carrots could be key to making greener buildings, say researchers A group of researchers at Britain's Lancaster University has been using a household food blender to mix particles from the root vegetable with concrete to see if they can produce a stronger and more environmentally sound product.     "We found out you could increase the strength of concrete by 80 percent by using a small amount of this new material," lead researcher Mohamed Saafi told Reuters. It also means less cement is required, therefore lowering the global carbon dioxide (CO2) output. Cement is responsible for seven percent of total global CO2 emissions, according to International Energy Agency estimates.


New moon: China to launch lunar lighting in outer space

New moon: China to launch lunar lighting in outer space China is planning to launch its own 'artificial moon' by 2020 to replace streetlamps and lower electricity costs in urban areas, state media reported Friday. Chengdu, a city in southwestern Sichuan province, is developing "illumination satellites" which will shine in tandem with the real moon, but are eight times brighter, according to China Daily. The first man-made moon will launch from Xichang Satellite Launch Center in Sichuan, with three more to follow in 2022 if the first test goes well, said Wu Chunfeng, head of Tian Fu New Area Science Society, the organization responsible for the project.


What Happened to My Friend Jamal Khashoggi Shows How Saudi Arabia Spreads Fear and Buys the West's Silence

What Happened to My Friend Jamal Khashoggi Shows How Saudi Arabia Spreads Fear and Buys the West's Silence Tawakkol Karman, who won the 2011 Nobel Peace Prize, on how the death of Jamal Khashoggi reflects Saudi policy in Yemen and beyond


The True Story Behind the Movie Can You Ever Forgive Me?

The True Story Behind the Movie Can You Ever Forgive Me? Here’s what the movie gets right and what it doesn't


The Making a Murderer Filmmakers on How Steven Avery's New Lawyer Changes Everything

The Making a Murderer Filmmakers on How Steven Avery's New Lawyer Changes Everything Filmmakers Moira Demos and Laura Ricciardi on how they used season 2 to responded to criticisms of Marking a Murderer's first season.


Water woes as drought leaves Germany's Rhine shallow

Water woes as drought leaves Germany's Rhine shallow Months of drought have left water levels on Germany's Rhine river at a record low, exposing a World War II bomb and forcing ship operators to halt services to prevent vessels from running aground. The water level on the Rhine on Friday reached just 77 centimetres (30 inches), 4 cm below a previous record low of 81 cm recorded in 2003, Cologne's waterworks authorities said. Although rainfall is expected next week, forecasters said it would not suffice to bring up water levels in Germany's most important waterway and a key shipping route for the Netherlands and France.


California Principal Apologizes for Sending Email Warning About a Black Man at Starbucks

California Principal Apologizes for Sending Email Warning About a Black Man at Starbucks A San Diego school principal apologized this week for sending an email to parents about a black man that perpetuated racist stereotypes.


How forensic science has helped rediscover forgotten apples

How forensic science has helped rediscover forgotten apples The UK is home to more than 3,600 apple varieties - but they can't be told apart by look or taste alone.


Former U.K. Prime Minister Says Electing Women Could Help Combat Wave of Populism

Former U.K. Prime Minister Says Electing Women Could Help Combat Wave of Populism Women are the answer to rising populism and extremism in the U.K., according to the country's former Prime Minster John Major.


WHO says Zika risk low in Pacific ahead of Meghan visit

WHO says Zika risk low in Pacific ahead of Meghan visit As Prince Harry and his expectant wife Meghan prepare to tour Fiji and Tonga next week, the World Health Organisation (WHO) has declared the risk of contracting Zika virus in the Pacific nations is low. The British royals, currently in Australia, arranged their trip before Meghan's pregnancy was known, sparking fears she and her unborn baby could be vulnerable in the island nations, where Zika is officially listed as a risk.


93 More Women Accuse Former USC Gynecologist George Tyndall of Sexual Misconduct

93 More Women Accuse Former USC Gynecologist George Tyndall of Sexual Misconduct He has faced accusations from about 500 current and former students


An Australian Woman Has Been Charged After Faking Cancer to Raise Money

An Australian Woman Has Been Charged After Faking Cancer to Raise Money She allegedly raised tens of thousands of dollars for a fraudulent GoFundMe page


Barcelona's Sagrada Familia Church Has Been Under Construction for 136 Years. That's a Lot of Unpaid Permit Fees

Barcelona's Sagrada Familia Church Has Been Under Construction for 136 Years. That's a Lot of Unpaid Permit Fees The famously unfinished basilica has been under construction without a permit for over a century


S.Africa divers risk all to poach marine delicacies for China diners

S.Africa divers risk all to poach marine delicacies for China diners Investigators are looking into allegations by fellow divers and his family that he was murdered, shot by a special task force during an anti-poaching operation in an increasingly violent battle between South African authorities and illegal hunters of abalone shellfish and rock lobster. Abalone is a delicacy prized in Hong Kong, mainland China and elsewhere in east Asia, where dishes featuring the marine molluscs are coveted at wedding banquets and can cost thousands of dollars. Illegal divers also search for rock lobster which is sold on the local market.


'My Kind of Guy.' President Trump Praises Montana Congressman Who Assaulted a Reporter

'My Kind of Guy.' President Trump Praises Montana Congressman Who Assaulted a Reporter "Any guy that can do a body slam — he's my kind of guy," the President said at a rally


China Wants Its Own X-37B Spaceplane

China Wants Its Own X-37B Spaceplane But spaceplanes come with certain liabilities.


NASA puts out the call for science and technology payloads made for the moon

NASA puts out the call for science and technology payloads made for the moon NASA is following up on its plan to purchase rides on commercial lunar landers by soliciting ideas for the scientific and technological payloads to put on them. Those payloads could be flying to the moon as early as next year, NASA said today in its announcement of a program known as Lunar Surface Instrument and Technology Payloads. Somewhere between $24 million and $36 million would be available for the first round of payloads, with eight to 12 payloads expected to be selected. “We are looking for ways to not only conduct lunar science but to also use the moon as… Read More


What's next for Paul Allen's big investments? It's not clear

What's next for Paul Allen's big investments? It's not clear SEATTLE (AP) — Prior to his death on Monday, billionaire Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen invested large sums in technology ventures, research projects and philanthropy, some of it eclectic and highly speculative. What happens to those commitments now?


De Beers eyes tech markets for synthetic diamonds future

De Beers eyes tech markets for synthetic diamonds future TORONTO/LONDON (Reuters) - Anglo American unit De Beers (AAL.L) is going after lucrative, but elusive high-tech markets in quantum computing, as it aims to expand its lab-grown diamond business beyond drilling and cutting. Element Six, De Beers' synthetic diamond arm, is building a $94 million factory in Portland, Oregon, an expansion that comes as scientists from Moscow to London push to develop diamonds for futuristic applications. Now coming of age after decades of experiments, technology called chemical vapour deposition, or CVD, offers a path to higher-quality, lower-cost production of synthetic diamonds and that opens the door to potential new computing markets.


Breaching dams to save Northwest orcas is contentious issue

Breaching dams to save Northwest orcas is contentious issue TACOMA, Wash. (AP) — Calls to breach four hydroelectric dams in Washington state have grown louder in recent months as the plight of critically endangered Northwest orcas has captured global attention.


The T Rex’s tiny baby arms might have been way more useful than they seem

The T Rex’s tiny baby arms might have been way more useful than they seem

Running into a Tyrannosaurus rex in the wild would have been a truly frightening thing for just about any animal that roamed the earth between 65 million and 80 million years ago, and for an obvious reason. The mighty meat-eater was huge in size and had a mouth built to turn bones into powder. If it snagged you with its jaws you were probably going to have a bad time, but nobody was afraid of its puny little arms... or were they?

As Live Science reports, a new study presented at a recent meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology took a close look at how T. rex's arms would have functioned, and it makes some bold predictions.

Just how T. rex used its arms and for what purpose has been hotly debated for years and years. Some believe the arms didn't do much of anything, while others have suggested that the tiny limbs flailed wildly with sharp claws that could have seriously injured prey or foes.

This latest round of research approaches things from a different angle, seeking to determine the range of movement of the arms as a clue to their usefulness. The researchers studied the limbs of two distant modern relatives, the alligator and turkey, for hints. What the team concluded is that the T. rex could likely have turned its hands inward if it wanted to, and it may have used its arms to hold prey in place or pull it closer.

The idea here is that the T. rex knew its jaws were its most potent weapon and so it used its arms to keep prey at the perfect biting distance. We'll of course never know for sure unless we could somehow watch a T. rex or similar upright carnivore find a meal, but the researchers are confident in what the fossils and modern animals tell them about how the dinosaur could move its limbs.


Everything You Know About the Fate of Lottery Winners Is Probably Wrong, According to Science

Everything You Know About the Fate of Lottery Winners Is Probably Wrong, According to Science Overall the money won led to positive long-term satisfaction and researchers found that there was a connection between a financial life satisfaction and long term overall life satisfaction.


President Donald Trump Wants to Stop the Caravan. Here's What Experts Think Would Help

President Donald Trump Wants to Stop the Caravan. Here's What Experts Think Would Help For the second year in a row, President Donald Trump is upset about a caravan of Central American migrants headed to the United States.


The world’s biggest organism is facing its end

The world’s biggest organism is facing its end At first glance, Pando is unimpressive. If you aren’t looking for it, you could easily drive past the homogenous forest of stems ranging from a few inches to some 100 feet (about 30 meters) tall—the biggest they appear more like trunks—all with matching leaves, on one of the few roads leading to Fish Lake in…


In toothy prequel, piranha-like fish menaced Jurassic seas

In toothy prequel, piranha-like fish menaced Jurassic seas Scientists said on Thursday they have unearthed in southern Germany the fossil of a fish that, with its mouth full of razor-sharp teeth, strongly resembled today's piranhas, the stars of more than their fair share of Hollywood horror films. Named Piranhamesodon pinnatomus, it is the earliest known example of a bony fish - as opposed to cartilaginous fish like sharks - able to slice flesh rather than simply swallowing prey, enabling it to attack victims larger than itself as piranhas can. Piranhas are freshwater fish that inhabit rivers and lakes in South America.


How can genetic data be better encrypted? Researchers find a way

How can genetic data be better encrypted? Researchers find a way Using nothing more than a simple vial of saliva, millions of people have created DNA profiles on genealogy websites. This problem of access is one that Bonnie Berger, a professor of mathematics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and her colleagues think they can solve, with a new cryptographic system to protect the information. "We're currently at a stalemate in sharing all this genomic data," Berger told AFP.


Genes play significant role in whether students to go to university, scientists find

Genes play significant role in whether students to go to university, scientists find Genetics plays a significant role in whether young adults choose to go to university, which university they choose to attend and how well they do, a new study suggests. Previous studies have shown that genetics plays a major role in academic achievement at school, with 58 per cent of individual differences between students in GCSE scores due to genetic factors. However, it was unclear if DNA was important in later life. Using data from identical twins to tease out how much of university choice was genetic,  researchers from King’s College London found that genes explained 57 per cent of the differences in A-level exam results and 46 per cent of the difference in achievement at university. They also found genetics accounted for 51 per cent of the difference in whether young people chose to go to university and 57 per cent of the difference in the quality of the chosen university. Dr Emily Smith-Woolley, from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, who co-led the research said: ‘We have shown for the first time that genetic influence on educational achievement continues into higher education. “Our results also demonstrate that the appetite young adults have for choosing to continue with higher education is in part, influenced by their DNA.” The researchers also found that shared environmental factors – such as families and schools - influenced the choice of whether to go to university, accounting for 36 per cent of the differences between students. However, shared environmental influences appear to become less important over time, become negligible for achievement at university.   Dr Ziada Ayorech, from the IoPPN, who co-led the research said: ‘Unlike secondary school, where students tend to share educational experiences, university provides young people with greater opportunity to be independent and to carve out their interests based on their natural abilities and aptitudes. “Students’ unique environments – such as new friends, and new experiences – appear to be explaining differences in university achievement and the role of shared environment becomes less significant.” The results were based on studying 3,000 pairs of twins from the UK as well as 3,000 people who had their gene sequenced. Comparing identical and non-identical twin pairs allows researchers to determine the overall impact of genetics on how much people differ on measures like exam scores. If identical twins' exam scores are more alike than those of non-identical twins this implies the difference between twin pairs is due to genetic factors The results were published in the journal Scientific Reports.


Startup plans to launch small satellites from Virginia coast

Startup plans to launch small satellites from Virginia coast NORFOLK, Va. (AP) — A California-based startup has announced big plans to go small as it reaches into space, rocketing satellites the size of loaves of bread into orbit from Virginia.


Summer drought may shrink supplies of French spuds

Summer drought may shrink supplies of French spuds It's harvest time and the chips are down for potato producers in northern France where a long summer drought could see French spuds shrink in size and volume. The potatoes "first lacked water and then when rain fell in July started growing anew" which means the original plants lost starch and gained too much water, spoiling them, said Regis Dumont, a potato farmer from Warhem near the Belgian border. Then they got a roasting, with temperatures soaring to 37 degrees centigrade (98 Fahrenheit) in August, unusually hot for the northern French plains which account for two-thirds of the national potato crop.


Trump Plans to Ditch a 144-Year-Old Postal Treaty in His Latest Clash With China

Trump Plans to Ditch a 144-Year-Old Postal Treaty in His Latest Clash With China President Donald Trump plans to withdraw the U.S. from a 192-nation treaty that gives Chinese companies discounted shipping rates for small packages sent to American consumers


You Are Not Your DNA

You Are Not Your DNA Just days before Warren announced her DNA ancestry results, headlines were warning of a new threat to the genetic privacy of us all. The privacy warnings came from a paper in Science, which proclaimed that detectives, or hackers for that matter, could find the identity of “almost anyone” from a sample of DNA. Of course, if you committed rape or murder and left your DNA at the scene, this DNA matching capability could reveal that you are the perpetrator.


Nobel Prize Winner Gets Dedicated Bike Rack Spot Since He’s Not Such a Great Driver

Nobel Prize Winner Gets Dedicated Bike Rack Spot Since He’s Not Such a Great Driver George Smith may be one of chemistry’s foremost minds, but he admits he’s not so hot behind the wheel.


Donald Trump Didn't Really Win 52% of White Women in 2016

Donald Trump Didn't Really Win 52% of White Women in 2016 The idea that a majority of white women voted for the President has shaped national narratives. The only problem? It's probably wrong.


Women Achieved Enormous Power in Ancient Egypt. What They Did With It Is a Warning for Today

Women Achieved Enormous Power in Ancient Egypt. What They Did With It Is a Warning for Today "Ancient Egypt allowed more females into power in the ancient world than any other place on earth. Was that society somehow more progressive than we might expect? The answer is a quick and deflating no."


L.L. Bean rebuffs boycott over granddaughter’s big Trump donation

L.L. Bean rebuffs boycott over granddaughter’s big Trump donation A man wipes off the headlights of the L.L. Bean Bootmobile in the parking lot at the facility where the famous outdoor boot is made. L.L. Bean is pushing back against a boycott led by a group urging consumers not to shop at retailers that support President-elect Donald Trump after it was revealed that Linda Bean, heir of the Maine-based company’s founder, had donated to a political action committee that helped elect Trump. “We are deeply troubled by the portrayal of L.L. Bean as a supporter of any political agenda,” Shawn Gorman, L.L. Bean’s executive chairman, said in a statement posted to Facebook late Sunday.