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Blast at Ariana Grande concert in England kills 19 people

Blast at Ariana Grande concert in England kills 19 people MANCHESTER, England (AP) — An explosion struck an Ariana Grande concert attended by thousands of young music fans in northern England late Monday, killing at least 19 people and injuring dozens in what police were treating as a terrorist attack.


Human rights watchdog condemns Thailand hospital bomb

Human rights watchdog condemns Thailand hospital bomb BANGKOK (AP) — A human rights watchdog condemned the bombing of a Thai hospital that wounded more than 20 people on the third anniversary of a military coup, saying the blast was an inexcusable crime.


Deadly blast at Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England

Deadly blast at Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England At least 19 people were killed and more than 50 injured in an explosion at the end of a concert by U.S. singer Ariana Grande in the English city of Manchester on Monday and two U.S. officials said a suicide bomber was suspected.


Deadly blast at Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England

Deadly blast at Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England At least 19 people were killed and more than 50 injured in an explosion at the end of a concert by U.S. singer Ariana Grande in the English city of Manchester on Monday and two U.S. officials said a suicide bomber was suspected.


Deadly blast at Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England

Deadly blast at Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England At least 19 people were killed and more than 50 injured in an explosion at the end of a concert by U.S. singer Ariana Grande in the English city of Manchester on Monday and two U.S. officials said a suicide bomber was suspected.


At Least 19 Dead, 50 Injured in Blast After Ariana Grande Concert in Great Britain: Cops

At Least 19 Dead, 50 Injured in Blast After Ariana Grande Concert in Great Britain: Cops The explosion occurred following a concert by American pop star Ariana Grande, Manchester Police said.


At Least 19 Dead, 50 Injured in Blast After Ariana Grande Concert in Great Britain: Cops

At Least 19 Dead, 50 Injured in Blast After Ariana Grande Concert in Great Britain: Cops The explosion occurred following a concert by American pop star Ariana Grande, Manchester Police said.


Newfound ‘alien megastructure’ star leaves scientists baffled

Newfound ‘alien megastructure’ star leaves scientists baffled

You're forgiven if the name KIC 8462852 doesn't ring a bell. It's a far-off object, thought to be a star, which was only just discovered in late 2015, but it's already managed to totally confuse researchers in its extremely brief stint on the scientific stage. The star has continually exhibited extremely odd behavior, and has been repeatedly observed experiencing huge dips in brightness that don't seem to have any readily available explanation. Now, the star has been spotted performing the same dimming trick as it has in the past, and scientists are throwing out some extremely wild theories. 

KIC 8462852, otherwise known as "Tabby's Star" or "Boyajian's Star" depending on where you look, was caught in the act this past weekend, dimming in brightness by about three percent, which is a large enough change to be easily detected. Normally, the dimming of a star at regular intervals would indicate the presence of a planet in orbit, but there doesn't seem to be any pattern to the of dimming exhibited by KIC 8462852.

Researchers have thrown forth many possible explanations, including other, non-planetary celestial bodies passing in front of the star which are obscuring our line of sight, such as comets, and even the possibility that whatever is floating around the star isn't a naturally-occurring object at all, but instead a massive alien structure. As the research and observations continue, scientists around the globe are hoping that spectral readings will give them a clue as to what, if anything, passed in front of the star. Whatever the object happens to be, it's an exciting time for sky-gazers.


Newfound ‘alien megastructure’ star leaves scientists baffled

Newfound ‘alien megastructure’ star leaves scientists baffled

You're forgiven if the name KIC 8462852 doesn't ring a bell. It's a far-off object, thought to be a star, which was only just discovered in late 2015, but it's already managed to totally confuse researchers in its extremely brief stint on the scientific stage. The star has continually exhibited extremely odd behavior, and has been repeatedly observed experiencing huge dips in brightness that don't seem to have any readily available explanation. Now, the star has been spotted performing the same dimming trick as it has in the past, and scientists are throwing out some extremely wild theories. 

KIC 8462852, otherwise known as "Tabby's Star" or "Boyajian's Star" depending on where you look, was caught in the act this past weekend, dimming in brightness by about three percent, which is a large enough change to be easily detected. Normally, the dimming of a star at regular intervals would indicate the presence of a planet in orbit, but there doesn't seem to be any pattern to the of dimming exhibited by KIC 8462852.

Researchers have thrown forth many possible explanations, including other, non-planetary celestial bodies passing in front of the star which are obscuring our line of sight, such as comets, and even the possibility that whatever is floating around the star isn't a naturally-occurring object at all, but instead a massive alien structure. As the research and observations continue, scientists around the globe are hoping that spectral readings will give them a clue as to what, if anything, passed in front of the star. Whatever the object happens to be, it's an exciting time for sky-gazers.


Newfound ‘alien megastructure’ star leaves scientists baffled

Newfound ‘alien megastructure’ star leaves scientists baffled

You're forgiven if the name KIC 8462852 doesn't ring a bell. It's a far-off object, thought to be a star, which was only just discovered in late 2015, but it's already managed to totally confuse researchers in its extremely brief stint on the scientific stage. The star has continually exhibited extremely odd behavior, and has been repeatedly observed experiencing huge dips in brightness that don't seem to have any readily available explanation. Now, the star has been spotted performing the same dimming trick as it has in the past, and scientists are throwing out some extremely wild theories. 

KIC 8462852, otherwise known as "Tabby's Star" or "Boyajian's Star" depending on where you look, was caught in the act this past weekend, dimming in brightness by about three percent, which is a large enough change to be easily detected. Normally, the dimming of a star at regular intervals would indicate the presence of a planet in orbit, but there doesn't seem to be any pattern to the of dimming exhibited by KIC 8462852.

Researchers have thrown forth many possible explanations, including other, non-planetary celestial bodies passing in front of the star which are obscuring our line of sight, such as comets, and even the possibility that whatever is floating around the star isn't a naturally-occurring object at all, but instead a massive alien structure. As the research and observations continue, scientists around the globe are hoping that spectral readings will give them a clue as to what, if anything, passed in front of the star. Whatever the object happens to be, it's an exciting time for sky-gazers.


Texas bathroom bill could expose secrets of transgender kids

Texas bathroom bill could expose secrets of transgender kids AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Each morning, Joanna Smith's 7-year-old son pulls on a T-shirt and shorts, boasts how fast he can tie his sneakers and heads to school. An honor-roll student who loves science and spelling, he often stays after class to run on the playground with his large group of friends.


Texas bathroom bill could expose secrets of transgender kids

Texas bathroom bill could expose secrets of transgender kids AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Each morning, Joanna Smith's 7-year-old son pulls on a T-shirt and shorts, boasts how fast he can tie his sneakers and heads to school. An honor-roll student who loves science and spelling, he often stays after class to run on the playground with his large group of friends.


British police says responding to serious incident at venue where Ariana Grande performing

British police says responding to serious incident at venue where Ariana Grande performing By Alistair Smout LONDON (Reuters) - British police said on Monday they had responded to a serious incident at a venue in the northern English city of Manchester where U.S. singer Ariana Grande had been performing. "Emergency services responding to serious incident at Manchester Arena," Greater Manchester Police said. "Avoid the area." Witnesses reported hearing a huge bang at the venue, Sky News said on Monday.


British police says responding to serious incident at venue where Ariana Grande performing

British police says responding to serious incident at venue where Ariana Grande performing By Alistair Smout LONDON (Reuters) - British police said on Monday they had responded to a serious incident at a venue in the northern English city of Manchester where U.S. singer Ariana Grande had been performing. "Emergency services responding to serious incident at Manchester Arena," Greater Manchester Police said. "Avoid the area." Witnesses reported hearing a huge bang at the venue, Sky News said on Monday.


Donald Trump has touched The Orb. Here's what that means

Donald Trump has touched The Orb. Here's what that means President Donald Trump's trip to Saudi Arabia over the weekend went largely as planned. He appeared jovial on his first trip abroad, he announced billions in Saudi investment in the U.S., and his speech on terrorism was well received.  Last, but not least, he touched The Orb. SEE ALSO: Well-done steak and other items on Donald Trump's tour rider And here’s Trump at the opening of the “Global Center for Combating Extremist Ideology” in Riyadh pic.twitter.com/gshRT2nFLU — BuzzFeed News (@BuzzFeedNews) May 21, 2017 Donald Trump became the first sitting U.S. president to touch The Orb.  The Orb, of course, has existed long before the United States and even the concept of democracy, government, or even society. Its origins remain unknown and no sitting U.S. president has ever dared touch it, out of both fear and respect for its Power. So what does it mean that Donald Trump touched it? Well, a few things. By touching The Orb, Donald Trump has seen all of history in one agonizing moment. All of The Orb's wealth of knowledge, which spans from literally everything from the very first dawn to the Earth's dark and horrid last days, has been burned into Donald Trump's mind in one horrifying instant. He has seen everything that has happened or will happen. This has no doubt changed him as a person. However, it is presently unclear if he even came out of this event with his sanity still in tact. For the next few months or years, Donald Trump will be unable to shake the image of seeing his own death.  It will replay in his mind on a constant loop. He will likely do everything he can to try to prevent this outcome, but as we all know, the future is already written and his feeble attempts will prove fruitless. He will either be able to accept this fact, or it will consume him entirely. Donald Trump has met and fought The Dark One.  At the end of his awful vision Donald Trump will have come face-to-face with Satan, Dark Lord of Hades, who explained to him the true and harrowing meaning of life, information no mortal should bear. Hearing these disgusting words from Satan's dreadful voice will have no doubt provoked Donald Trump to impulsively attack him. They battled in Hell's arena where Mr. Trump inevitably lost. As punishment he was cast into the fires below and tormented by Servants of Hell: creatures so horrific the human mind is incapable of imagining them.  As a reward for completing The Orb's Trial, Donald Trump has been temporarily granted God's powers.  If The Orb is pleased with Donald's trial he will have been rewarded with the powers of God. Fortunately, Donald lacks the complex understanding required to wield these powers to their full extent, if at all. The knowledge of having the divine power of God and the inability to use them to their full potential will undoubtedly frustrate him into derangement. The powers will most likely wear off harmlessly before he has the chance to accidentally undo the creation of Earth. Before long, his lust for The Orb will become insatiable, and he will need to be confined in a locked room until his desire wanes. The Orb's enigmatic essence is a powerful magnet, and Donald Trump's desire to once again touch The Orb will burn hotter than one thousand suns in a phenomenon known as "Orb Madness." It will drive him into hysterics and he will become inconsolable. For his own safety, he will be confined to a padded cell until it has been determined The Orb no longer dominates his thoughts. This could take days, months, or even years.  Bottom line? It's too soon to determine how this will play out, or even if The Orb was pleased with Donald's touch. Only time will tell and all we can do is speculate and pray to The Orb that Donald was a worthy enough subject to lay a mortal hand upon its enchanted surface.  WATCH: Race on a budget by revamping your lawnmower


Sherpas show how the human body can thrive in extreme environments

Sherpas show how the human body can thrive in extreme environments Mount Everest is a grueling, deadly place for many adventurers. Beyond the steep terrain, bone-chilling temperatures, and fierce weather, the air is so thin that your body can begin to shut down. That is, unless you're a Sherpa. Members of the Nepalese ethnic group have evolved over generations to withstand the oxygen-deprived atmosphere high in the Himalayas, a new study found.  SEE ALSO: Now you can climb Mount Everest in VR Sherpas are, biologically speaking, extremely efficient at producing the energy they need to reach such heights, even where oxygen is scarce, according to research published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.  Their cells are akin to fuel-efficient cars that can travel farther on less fuel. A porter fetches the ladders to help fix the route for climbers attempting to reach the summit of Mount Everest.Image: Tashi Sherpa/AP/REX/ShutterstockScientists say the findings not only help explain Sherpas' mountain-climbing prowess — they may also lead to new ways of treating oxygen deficiencies, called "hypoxia," in hospital patients. "By understanding how Sherpas are able to survive with low levels of oxygen, we can get clues to help us identify those at greatest risk in [intensive care units] and inform the development of better treatments to help in their recovery," Michael Grocott, a co-author of the study and professor at the University of Southampton in England, said in a press release.  Grocott is the chair of Xtreme Everest, a 10-year-old initiative by doctors, nurses, and scientists to study how our bodies respond to the extreme altitude on Mount Everest. Their ultimate goal is to improve outcomes for critically ill patients. With a 29,029-foot-high peak, Everest is the world's highest mountain. Everest Base Camp is around 17,600 feet, which is plenty high enough to sicken unadjusted visitors. An aerial photograph of Everest Base Camp.Image: Paula Bronstein/Getty ImagesAt those altitudes, where oxygen is scarce, the body is forced to work overtime to make sure the brain and body receive enough oxygen to function. Often, the body will produce more red blood cells, which carry blood to our organs and thicken the blood. As a result, blood flows more slowly and blood vessels are prone to tightening, which can cause dangerous build-up of fluid in the lungs and other risks. Mountain climbers can combat this by bringing oxygen supplies and ascending slowly, giving their bodies time to adjust. Sherpas, however, don't need such a boost.  Previous studies have shown that Sherpas produce fewer red blood cells at higher altitudes. They also produce higher levels of nitric oxide, a chemical that opens blood vessels and keeps blood flowing, which in turn gives them more energy to climb. Sherpas' remarkable physical skills, along with their local expertise, have made them the go-to guides and porters for international expeditions. It's an imperfect arrangement, however. Nepalese guides in recent years have protested poor pay and unsafe working conditions, and in 2014, they went on strike after 16 colleagues were killed in an avalanche. People attend a prayer service in New York City for Sherpa victims of the April 18, 2014, avalanche on Mt. Everest.Image: eric thayer/Getty ImagesFor Monday's study, a research team led by scientists at the University of Cambridge followed 15 Sherpas and 10 "lowlanders" — researchers living in non-high altitude areas — as they gradually ascended to the base camp. The lowlanders took samples, including blood and muscle biopsies, at three different times: in London, for the baseline measurement; upon arrival to base camp; and after two months working at base camp.  They compared those samples to those of the Sherpas, all of whom lived in relatively low-lying areas, and none of whom were "elite" high-altitude climbers. Sherpas' baseline measurements were taken in Kathmandu, Nepal. At baseline, Sherpas' mitochondria — the parts of human cells that respire to generate energy — were already more efficient at using oxygen to produce ATP than those of lowlanders, the samples revealed. ATP, or molecule adenosine triphosphate, is the energy that powers our bodies. A porter walks with a massive load towards Everest Base Camp near Lobuche, Nepal.Image: Tashi Sherpa/AP/REX/ShutterstockSherpas' measurements hardly changed once they reached the base camp, suggesting they were born with such biological traits. Lowlanders, meanwhile, saw their measurements change as their bodies acclimatized and began to mimic the Sherpas'. After two months at camp, Sherpas also produced more phosphocreatine, an energy reserve that acts as a buffer to help muscles contract when no ATP is available. Lowlanders, by contrast, saw their phosphocreatine levels crash.  And, unlike lowlanders, Sherpas did not experience a rapid increase in free radicals, which are molecules created by a lack of oxygen that can potentially damage cells and tissues. "Sherpas have spent thousands of years living at high altitudes, so it should be unsurprising that they have adapted to become more efficient at using oxygen and generating energy," Andrew Murray, the study's senior author and a senior lecturer at the University of Cambridge, said in the press release.  "When those of us from lower-lying countries spend time at high altitude, our bodies adapt to some extent to become more 'Sherpa-like', but we are no match for their efficiency," he said. WATCH: Drone captures breathtaking footage of Norwegian mountains


Sherpas show how the human body can thrive in extreme environments

Sherpas show how the human body can thrive in extreme environments Mount Everest is a grueling, deadly place for many adventurers. Beyond the steep terrain, bone-chilling temperatures, and fierce weather, the air is so thin that your body can begin to shut down. That is, unless you're a Sherpa. Members of the Nepalese ethnic group have evolved over generations to withstand the oxygen-deprived atmosphere high in the Himalayas, a new study found.  SEE ALSO: Now you can climb Mount Everest in VR Sherpas are, biologically speaking, extremely efficient at producing the energy they need to reach such heights, even where oxygen is scarce, according to research published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.  Their cells are akin to fuel-efficient cars that can travel farther on less fuel. A porter fetches the ladders to help fix the route for climbers attempting to reach the summit of Mount Everest.Image: Tashi Sherpa/AP/REX/ShutterstockScientists say the findings not only help explain Sherpas' mountain-climbing prowess — they may also lead to new ways of treating oxygen deficiencies, called "hypoxia," in hospital patients. "By understanding how Sherpas are able to survive with low levels of oxygen, we can get clues to help us identify those at greatest risk in [intensive care units] and inform the development of better treatments to help in their recovery," Michael Grocott, a co-author of the study and professor at the University of Southampton in England, said in a press release.  Grocott is the chair of Xtreme Everest, a 10-year-old initiative by doctors, nurses, and scientists to study how our bodies respond to the extreme altitude on Mount Everest. Their ultimate goal is to improve outcomes for critically ill patients. With a 29,029-foot-high peak, Everest is the world's highest mountain. Everest Base Camp is around 17,600 feet, which is plenty high enough to sicken unadjusted visitors. An aerial photograph of Everest Base Camp.Image: Paula Bronstein/Getty ImagesAt those altitudes, where oxygen is scarce, the body is forced to work overtime to make sure the brain and body receive enough oxygen to function. Often, the body will produce more red blood cells, which carry blood to our organs and thicken the blood. As a result, blood flows more slowly and blood vessels are prone to tightening, which can cause dangerous build-up of fluid in the lungs and other risks. Mountain climbers can combat this by bringing oxygen supplies and ascending slowly, giving their bodies time to adjust. Sherpas, however, don't need such a boost.  Previous studies have shown that Sherpas produce fewer red blood cells at higher altitudes. They also produce higher levels of nitric oxide, a chemical that opens blood vessels and keeps blood flowing, which in turn gives them more energy to climb. Sherpas' remarkable physical skills, along with their local expertise, have made them the go-to guides and porters for international expeditions. It's an imperfect arrangement, however. Nepalese guides in recent years have protested poor pay and unsafe working conditions, and in 2014, they went on strike after 16 colleagues were killed in an avalanche. People attend a prayer service in New York City for Sherpa victims of the April 18, 2014, avalanche on Mt. Everest.Image: eric thayer/Getty ImagesFor Monday's study, a research team led by scientists at the University of Cambridge followed 15 Sherpas and 10 "lowlanders" — researchers living in non-high altitude areas — as they gradually ascended to the base camp. The lowlanders took samples, including blood and muscle biopsies, at three different times: in London, for the baseline measurement; upon arrival to base camp; and after two months working at base camp.  They compared those samples to those of the Sherpas, all of whom lived in relatively low-lying areas, and none of whom were "elite" high-altitude climbers. Sherpas' baseline measurements were taken in Kathmandu, Nepal. At baseline, Sherpas' mitochondria — the parts of human cells that respire to generate energy — were already more efficient at using oxygen to produce ATP than those of lowlanders, the samples revealed. ATP, or molecule adenosine triphosphate, is the energy that powers our bodies. A porter walks with a massive load towards Everest Base Camp near Lobuche, Nepal.Image: Tashi Sherpa/AP/REX/ShutterstockSherpas' measurements hardly changed once they reached the base camp, suggesting they were born with such biological traits. Lowlanders, meanwhile, saw their measurements change as their bodies acclimatized and began to mimic the Sherpas'. After two months at camp, Sherpas also produced more phosphocreatine, an energy reserve that acts as a buffer to help muscles contract when no ATP is available. Lowlanders, by contrast, saw their phosphocreatine levels crash.  And, unlike lowlanders, Sherpas did not experience a rapid increase in free radicals, which are molecules created by a lack of oxygen that can potentially damage cells and tissues. "Sherpas have spent thousands of years living at high altitudes, so it should be unsurprising that they have adapted to become more efficient at using oxygen and generating energy," Andrew Murray, the study's senior author and a senior lecturer at the University of Cambridge, said in the press release.  "When those of us from lower-lying countries spend time at high altitude, our bodies adapt to some extent to become more 'Sherpa-like', but we are no match for their efficiency," he said. WATCH: Drone captures breathtaking footage of Norwegian mountains


Sherpas show how the human body can thrive in extreme environments

Sherpas show how the human body can thrive in extreme environments Mount Everest is a grueling, deadly place for many adventurers. Beyond the steep terrain, bone-chilling temperatures, and fierce weather, the air is so thin that your body can begin to shut down. That is, unless you're a Sherpa. Members of the Nepalese ethnic group have evolved over generations to withstand the oxygen-deprived atmosphere high in the Himalayas, a new study found.  SEE ALSO: Now you can climb Mount Everest in VR Sherpas are, biologically speaking, extremely efficient at producing the energy they need to reach such heights, even where oxygen is scarce, according to research published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.  Their cells are akin to fuel-efficient cars that can travel farther on less fuel. A porter fetches the ladders to help fix the route for climbers attempting to reach the summit of Mount Everest.Image: Tashi Sherpa/AP/REX/ShutterstockScientists say the findings not only help explain Sherpas' mountain-climbing prowess — they may also lead to new ways of treating oxygen deficiencies, called "hypoxia," in hospital patients. "By understanding how Sherpas are able to survive with low levels of oxygen, we can get clues to help us identify those at greatest risk in [intensive care units] and inform the development of better treatments to help in their recovery," Michael Grocott, a co-author of the study and professor at the University of Southampton in England, said in a press release.  Grocott is the chair of Xtreme Everest, a 10-year-old initiative by doctors, nurses, and scientists to study how our bodies respond to the extreme altitude on Mount Everest. Their ultimate goal is to improve outcomes for critically ill patients. With a 29,029-foot-high peak, Everest is the world's highest mountain. Everest Base Camp is around 17,600 feet, which is plenty high enough to sicken unadjusted visitors. An aerial photograph of Everest Base Camp.Image: Paula Bronstein/Getty ImagesAt those altitudes, where oxygen is scarce, the body is forced to work overtime to make sure the brain and body receive enough oxygen to function. Often, the body will produce more red blood cells, which carry blood to our organs and thicken the blood. As a result, blood flows more slowly and blood vessels are prone to tightening, which can cause dangerous build-up of fluid in the lungs and other risks. Mountain climbers can combat this by bringing oxygen supplies and ascending slowly, giving their bodies time to adjust. Sherpas, however, don't need such a boost.  Previous studies have shown that Sherpas produce fewer red blood cells at higher altitudes. They also produce higher levels of nitric oxide, a chemical that opens blood vessels and keeps blood flowing, which in turn gives them more energy to climb. Sherpas' remarkable physical skills, along with their local expertise, have made them the go-to guides and porters for international expeditions. It's an imperfect arrangement, however. Nepalese guides in recent years have protested poor pay and unsafe working conditions, and in 2014, they went on strike after 16 colleagues were killed in an avalanche. People attend a prayer service in New York City for Sherpa victims of the April 18, 2014, avalanche on Mt. Everest.Image: eric thayer/Getty ImagesFor Monday's study, a research team led by scientists at the University of Cambridge followed 15 Sherpas and 10 "lowlanders" — researchers living in non-high altitude areas — as they gradually ascended to the base camp. The lowlanders took samples, including blood and muscle biopsies, at three different times: in London, for the baseline measurement; upon arrival to base camp; and after two months working at base camp.  They compared those samples to those of the Sherpas, all of whom lived in relatively low-lying areas, and none of whom were "elite" high-altitude climbers. Sherpas' baseline measurements were taken in Kathmandu, Nepal. At baseline, Sherpas' mitochondria — the parts of human cells that respire to generate energy — were already more efficient at using oxygen to produce ATP than those of lowlanders, the samples revealed. ATP, or molecule adenosine triphosphate, is the energy that powers our bodies. A porter walks with a massive load towards Everest Base Camp near Lobuche, Nepal.Image: Tashi Sherpa/AP/REX/ShutterstockSherpas' measurements hardly changed once they reached the base camp, suggesting they were born with such biological traits. Lowlanders, meanwhile, saw their measurements change as their bodies acclimatized and began to mimic the Sherpas'. After two months at camp, Sherpas also produced more phosphocreatine, an energy reserve that acts as a buffer to help muscles contract when no ATP is available. Lowlanders, by contrast, saw their phosphocreatine levels crash.  And, unlike lowlanders, Sherpas did not experience a rapid increase in free radicals, which are molecules created by a lack of oxygen that can potentially damage cells and tissues. "Sherpas have spent thousands of years living at high altitudes, so it should be unsurprising that they have adapted to become more efficient at using oxygen and generating energy," Andrew Murray, the study's senior author and a senior lecturer at the University of Cambridge, said in the press release.  "When those of us from lower-lying countries spend time at high altitude, our bodies adapt to some extent to become more 'Sherpa-like', but we are no match for their efficiency," he said. WATCH: Drone captures breathtaking footage of Norwegian mountains


New leak sheds light on Apple’s upcoming 10.5-inch iPad Pro

New leak sheds light on Apple’s upcoming 10.5-inch iPad Pro

In 2010, Apple launched the iPad and reinvigorated, what was then, an arguably non-existent tablet market. As sales skyrocketed, even Apple executives were taken aback the iPad's popularity, with the device quickly becoming the fastest-selling product in consumer electronics history.

A few years later, iPad sales not only began tapering off, but declining substantially. In a relatively short amount of time, the narrative surrounding the iPad shifted from "the iPad is the future of computing" to "how can Apple save the iPad?" As a quick example, Apple last quarter sold 8.92 million iPads, the first time quarterly sales checked in below 9 million units since 2011.

Undeterred, Tim Cook remains confident that there's a lot of room for the iPad to return to growth. Looking ahead, there are strong rumors that Apple at WWDC this year will unveil a brand new iPad Pro with a 10.5-inch edge-to-edge display packed into a form factor no larger than the current 9.7-inch iPad model.

Earlier today, new images purporting to be cases for the aforementioned 10.5-inch iPad Pro and a new 12.9-inch iPad Pro surfaced online via Benjamin Geskin. The leaked images show a four-speaker design, a lightning port, and interestingly enough, a vertical camera orientation similar to what we've seen on various iPhone 8 leaks.

As for other details surrounding the 10.5-inch iPad Pro model, Geskin relays that it won't be completely bezel-less.

https://twitter.com/VenyaGeskin1/status/866662604160331776

7mm bezels all around the device will certainly be sleek, but not as sleek as the iPhone 8 with its reported 4mm bezels. Also of note is that Apple's new iPad models will incorporate the same static home button originally introduced on last year's iPhone 7.

Additionally, Geskin relays that there will be no new iPad Mini this year, corroborating our exclusive report from last week claiming that Apple will be discontinuing the iPad Mini amid disappointing sales. Some have suggested that Apple releasing larger-screened iPhone models in 2014 with the iPhone 6 and 6s made the iPad Mini form factor less compelling.

Apple's iPad line certainly needs a breath of fresh air and it will be interesting to see if the upcoming 10.5-inch iPad Pro model can help turn around slumping sales.


New leak sheds light on Apple’s upcoming 10.5-inch iPad Pro

New leak sheds light on Apple’s upcoming 10.5-inch iPad Pro

In 2010, Apple launched the iPad and reinvigorated, what was then, an arguably non-existent tablet market. As sales skyrocketed, even Apple executives were taken aback the iPad's popularity, with the device quickly becoming the fastest-selling product in consumer electronics history.

A few years later, iPad sales not only began tapering off, but declining substantially. In a relatively short amount of time, the narrative surrounding the iPad shifted from "the iPad is the future of computing" to "how can Apple save the iPad?" As a quick example, Apple last quarter sold 8.92 million iPads, the first time quarterly sales checked in below 9 million units since 2011.

Undeterred, Tim Cook remains confident that there's a lot of room for the iPad to return to growth. Looking ahead, there are strong rumors that Apple at WWDC this year will unveil a brand new iPad Pro with a 10.5-inch edge-to-edge display packed into a form factor no larger than the current 9.7-inch iPad model.

Earlier today, new images purporting to be cases for the aforementioned 10.5-inch iPad Pro and a new 12.9-inch iPad Pro surfaced online via Benjamin Geskin. The leaked images show a four-speaker design, a lightning port, and interestingly enough, a vertical camera orientation similar to what we've seen on various iPhone 8 leaks.

As for other details surrounding the 10.5-inch iPad Pro model, Geskin relays that it won't be completely bezel-less.

https://twitter.com/VenyaGeskin1/status/866662604160331776

7mm bezels all around the device will certainly be sleek, but not as sleek as the iPhone 8 with its reported 4mm bezels. Also of note is that Apple's new iPad models will incorporate the same static home button originally introduced on last year's iPhone 7.

Additionally, Geskin relays that there will be no new iPad Mini this year, corroborating our exclusive report from last week claiming that Apple will be discontinuing the iPad Mini amid disappointing sales. Some have suggested that Apple releasing larger-screened iPhone models in 2014 with the iPhone 6 and 6s made the iPad Mini form factor less compelling.

Apple's iPad line certainly needs a breath of fresh air and it will be interesting to see if the upcoming 10.5-inch iPad Pro model can help turn around slumping sales.


New leak sheds light on Apple’s upcoming 10.5-inch iPad Pro

New leak sheds light on Apple’s upcoming 10.5-inch iPad Pro

In 2010, Apple launched the iPad and reinvigorated, what was then, an arguably non-existent tablet market. As sales skyrocketed, even Apple executives were taken aback the iPad's popularity, with the device quickly becoming the fastest-selling product in consumer electronics history.

A few years later, iPad sales not only began tapering off, but declining substantially. In a relatively short amount of time, the narrative surrounding the iPad shifted from "the iPad is the future of computing" to "how can Apple save the iPad?" As a quick example, Apple last quarter sold 8.92 million iPads, the first time quarterly sales checked in below 9 million units since 2011.

Undeterred, Tim Cook remains confident that there's a lot of room for the iPad to return to growth. Looking ahead, there are strong rumors that Apple at WWDC this year will unveil a brand new iPad Pro with a 10.5-inch edge-to-edge display packed into a form factor no larger than the current 9.7-inch iPad model.

Earlier today, new images purporting to be cases for the aforementioned 10.5-inch iPad Pro and a new 12.9-inch iPad Pro surfaced online via Benjamin Geskin. The leaked images show a four-speaker design, a lightning port, and interestingly enough, a vertical camera orientation similar to what we've seen on various iPhone 8 leaks.

As for other details surrounding the 10.5-inch iPad Pro model, Geskin relays that it won't be completely bezel-less.

https://twitter.com/VenyaGeskin1/status/866662604160331776

7mm bezels all around the device will certainly be sleek, but not as sleek as the iPhone 8 with its reported 4mm bezels. Also of note is that Apple's new iPad models will incorporate the same static home button originally introduced on last year's iPhone 7.

Additionally, Geskin relays that there will be no new iPad Mini this year, corroborating our exclusive report from last week claiming that Apple will be discontinuing the iPad Mini amid disappointing sales. Some have suggested that Apple releasing larger-screened iPhone models in 2014 with the iPhone 6 and 6s made the iPad Mini form factor less compelling.

Apple's iPad line certainly needs a breath of fresh air and it will be interesting to see if the upcoming 10.5-inch iPad Pro model can help turn around slumping sales.


UN condemns North Korea missile launch, vows new sanctions

UN condemns North Korea missile launch, vows new sanctions UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The Security Council strongly condemned North Korea's "flagrant and provocative defiance" of U.N. sanctions banning ballistic missile tests on Monday and again vowed to impose new sanctions in response to its latest launch.


UN condemns North Korea missile launch, vows new sanctions

UN condemns North Korea missile launch, vows new sanctions UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The Security Council strongly condemned North Korea's "flagrant and provocative defiance" of U.N. sanctions banning ballistic missile tests on Monday and again vowed to impose new sanctions in response to its latest launch.


Boeing blamed for maintenance errors on Air Force One

Boeing blamed for maintenance errors on Air Force One WASHINGTON (AP) — Boeing mechanics are to blame for accidental contamination of oxygen systems aboard one of the modified Boeing 747 planes known as Air Force One used for presidential travel, the Air Force said in an investigation report.


Boeing blamed for maintenance errors on Air Force One

Boeing blamed for maintenance errors on Air Force One WASHINGTON (AP) — Boeing mechanics are to blame for accidental contamination of oxygen systems aboard one of the modified Boeing 747 planes known as Air Force One used for presidential travel, the Air Force said in an investigation report.


Everything points to Apple launching new MacBooks next month

Everything points to Apple launching new MacBooks next month Apple will unveil the next big thing for its various software operating systems at WWDC 2017, including iOS 11 and the next macOS major update. But the iPhone maker is also tipped to launch a variety of new products at the show, including the Siri speaker, a 10.5-inch iPad Pro, and new MacBooks. A new report says that Apple is indeed expected to launch new laptops this quarter, and there’s reason to be excited. In a new research note to customers, TrendForce said that notebooks are having a little moment, again. Shipments for the first quarter of the year grew by 6.1% compared to last year, totaling around 37.81 million. That’s a 15.6% decline from the Christmas quarter, but still an impressive result for the period. Apple placed fifth in TrendForce's top, with 3.4 million MacBook laptops shipped during the period — that marks a 15.8% decline compared to the December quarter, but a 15.4% increase compared to last year. TrendForce quotes the MacBook Pro with TouchBar as the device that contributed significantly to the overall shipments. Similarly, the researchers believe the 12-inch MacBook will help Apple ship 10% more laptops in the second quarter of this year than last year. That’s because Apple reportedly plans to launch a new version of the 12-inch MacBook that will feature a new processor. The report notes that promotional pricing for some older models might also be in order. A previous report said that Apple will update the MacBook Pro as well, even if it only launched a new model in late 2016. TrendForce makes no mention of other MacBook updates for the quarter.


Everything points to Apple launching new MacBooks next month

Everything points to Apple launching new MacBooks next month Apple will unveil the next big thing for its various software operating systems at WWDC 2017, including iOS 11 and the next macOS major update. But the iPhone maker is also tipped to launch a variety of new products at the show, including the Siri speaker, a 10.5-inch iPad Pro, and new MacBooks. A new report says that Apple is indeed expected to launch new laptops this quarter, and there’s reason to be excited. In a new research note to customers, TrendForce said that notebooks are having a little moment, again. Shipments for the first quarter of the year grew by 6.1% compared to last year, totaling around 37.81 million. That’s a 15.6% decline from the Christmas quarter, but still an impressive result for the period. Apple placed fifth in TrendForce's top, with 3.4 million MacBook laptops shipped during the period — that marks a 15.8% decline compared to the December quarter, but a 15.4% increase compared to last year. TrendForce quotes the MacBook Pro with TouchBar as the device that contributed significantly to the overall shipments. Similarly, the researchers believe the 12-inch MacBook will help Apple ship 10% more laptops in the second quarter of this year than last year. That’s because Apple reportedly plans to launch a new version of the 12-inch MacBook that will feature a new processor. The report notes that promotional pricing for some older models might also be in order. A previous report said that Apple will update the MacBook Pro as well, even if it only launched a new model in late 2016. TrendForce makes no mention of other MacBook updates for the quarter.


Everything points to Apple launching new MacBooks next month

Everything points to Apple launching new MacBooks next month Apple will unveil the next big thing for its various software operating systems at WWDC 2017, including iOS 11 and the next macOS major update. But the iPhone maker is also tipped to launch a variety of new products at the show, including the Siri speaker, a 10.5-inch iPad Pro, and new MacBooks. A new report says that Apple is indeed expected to launch new laptops this quarter, and there’s reason to be excited. In a new research note to customers, TrendForce said that notebooks are having a little moment, again. Shipments for the first quarter of the year grew by 6.1% compared to last year, totaling around 37.81 million. That’s a 15.6% decline from the Christmas quarter, but still an impressive result for the period. Apple placed fifth in TrendForce's top, with 3.4 million MacBook laptops shipped during the period — that marks a 15.8% decline compared to the December quarter, but a 15.4% increase compared to last year. TrendForce quotes the MacBook Pro with TouchBar as the device that contributed significantly to the overall shipments. Similarly, the researchers believe the 12-inch MacBook will help Apple ship 10% more laptops in the second quarter of this year than last year. That’s because Apple reportedly plans to launch a new version of the 12-inch MacBook that will feature a new processor. The report notes that promotional pricing for some older models might also be in order. A previous report said that Apple will update the MacBook Pro as well, even if it only launched a new model in late 2016. TrendForce makes no mention of other MacBook updates for the quarter.


Israel: Palestinian killed attacking police as Trump visited

Israel: Palestinian killed attacking police as Trump visited JERUSALEM (AP) — Israeli police said a Palestinian attacker was killed after he tried to stab officers near Jerusalem as President Donald Trump visited the city on Monday, while clashes erupted in the West Bank as Palestinians declared a strike in solidarity with hundreds of hunger striking prisoners held in Israeli jails.


Israel: Palestinian killed attacking police as Trump visited

Israel: Palestinian killed attacking police as Trump visited JERUSALEM (AP) — Israeli police said a Palestinian attacker was killed after he tried to stab officers near Jerusalem as President Donald Trump visited the city on Monday, while clashes erupted in the West Bank as Palestinians declared a strike in solidarity with hundreds of hunger striking prisoners held in Israeli jails.


Israel: Palestinian killed attacking police as Trump visited

Israel: Palestinian killed attacking police as Trump visited JERUSALEM (AP) — Israeli police said a Palestinian attacker was killed after he tried to stab officers near Jerusalem as President Donald Trump visited the city on Monday, while clashes erupted in the West Bank as Palestinians declared a strike in solidarity with hundreds of hunger striking prisoners held in Israeli jails.


Gambian authorities seize ex-president Jammeh's bank accounts

Gambian authorities seize ex-president Jammeh's bank accounts Gambian authorities have seized assets including 86 bank accounts and 131 properties linked to former president Yahya Jammeh, an official said on Monday, as an investigation into the veteran ruler's wealth gathers pace. The new government has accused Jammeh of massive fraud including siphoning off public money during his 22-year rule that ended in election defeat and disgraced exile in Equatorial Guinea in January. Jammeh has been out of contact since leaving for exile and his associates no longer respond to journalists' queries about the accusations against him.


Gambian authorities seize ex-president Jammeh's bank accounts

Gambian authorities seize ex-president Jammeh's bank accounts Gambian authorities have seized assets including 86 bank accounts and 131 properties linked to former president Yahya Jammeh, an official said on Monday, as an investigation into the veteran ruler's wealth gathers pace. The new government has accused Jammeh of massive fraud including siphoning off public money during his 22-year rule that ended in election defeat and disgraced exile in Equatorial Guinea in January. Jammeh has been out of contact since leaving for exile and his associates no longer respond to journalists' queries about the accusations against him.


Gambian authorities seize ex-president Jammeh's bank accounts

Gambian authorities seize ex-president Jammeh's bank accounts Gambian authorities have seized assets including 86 bank accounts and 131 properties linked to former president Yahya Jammeh, an official said on Monday, as an investigation into the veteran ruler's wealth gathers pace. The new government has accused Jammeh of massive fraud including siphoning off public money during his 22-year rule that ended in election defeat and disgraced exile in Equatorial Guinea in January. Jammeh has been out of contact since leaving for exile and his associates no longer respond to journalists' queries about the accusations against him.


Comey friend: Here’s what the fired FBI director will — and won’t — reveal in Senate hearing

Comey friend: Here’s what the fired FBI director will — and won’t — reveal in Senate hearing James Comey’s friend Benjamin Wittes, who made headlines last week when he talked and wrote about Comey, made further comments in an interview today.