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Lawyer says Trump administration moved to squelch testimony

Lawyer says Trump administration moved to squelch testimony WASHINGTON (AP) — A lawyer for former deputy Attorney General Sally Yates wrote in letters last week that the Trump administration was trying to limit her testimony at congressional hearings focused on Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election. The hearing was later canceled by the House intelligence committee chairman.


Lawyer says Trump administration moved to squelch testimony

Lawyer says Trump administration moved to squelch testimony WASHINGTON (AP) — A lawyer for former deputy Attorney General Sally Yates wrote in letters last week that the Trump administration was trying to limit her testimony at congressional hearings focused on Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election. The hearing was later canceled by the House intelligence committee chairman.


South Korea officials: Bones found near ferry not of victims

South Korea officials: Bones found near ferry not of victims SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — The first government announcement Tuesday was startling: Salvage crews had found bones near the wreckage of the Sewol ferry, which sank in 2014 and killed 304 people.


Mom Outraged at TSA, Claims They Treated Her Young Son and Family 'Like Dogs'

Mom Outraged at TSA, Claims They Treated Her Young Son and Family 'Like Dogs' The incident happened Sunday in Dallas.


Mom Outraged at TSA, Claims They Treated Her Young Son and Family 'Like Dogs'

Mom Outraged at TSA, Claims They Treated Her Young Son and Family 'Like Dogs' The incident happened Sunday in Dallas.


Clashes in Kashmir: Civilians killed in protests against Indian rule

Clashes in Kashmir: Civilians killed in protests against Indian rule Three civilians were killed and 28 other people were injured in anti-India protests that erupted Tuesday following a gunbattle between rebels and government forces that killed a rebel in disputed Kashmir, police and witnesses said.


Couple Arrested After Trying to Sell Baby on Craigslist for $3,000: Cops

Couple Arrested After Trying to Sell Baby on Craigslist for $3,000: Cops John David Cain, 26, and Deanna Lynn Greer, 37, are accused of trying to sell their 5-month-old to an undercover cop.


Couple Arrested After Trying to Sell Baby on Craigslist for $3,000: Cops

Couple Arrested After Trying to Sell Baby on Craigslist for $3,000: Cops John David Cain, 26, and Deanna Lynn Greer, 37, are accused of trying to sell their 5-month-old to an undercover cop.


How to Build Your Budget in Retirement

How to Build Your Budget in Retirement The earlier you look at how much you will need during retirement, the more time you will have to adjust your current routine. Conventional wisdom is your spending will go down in retirement. For most, spending stays the same or increases, especially at the start of retirement, says Thomas J. O'Connell, president of International Financial Advisory Group in Parsippany, New Jersey.


How to Build Your Budget in Retirement

How to Build Your Budget in Retirement The earlier you look at how much you will need during retirement, the more time you will have to adjust your current routine. Conventional wisdom is your spending will go down in retirement. For most, spending stays the same or increases, especially at the start of retirement, says Thomas J. O'Connell, president of International Financial Advisory Group in Parsippany, New Jersey.


Sewol ferry 'remains' are animal bones: S. Korea ministry

Sewol ferry 'remains' are animal bones: S. Korea ministry Bone fragments recovered from the wreck of South Korea's Sewol ferry are from an animal and not human remains, the maritime ministry said Tuesday, dashing hopes of the relatives of missing victims. Authorities had earlier announced the pieces were human -- raising the prospect of closure for families of at least some of the nine passengers whose bodies were never found after the 2014 maritime disaster.


Sewol ferry 'remains' are animal bones: S. Korea ministry

Sewol ferry 'remains' are animal bones: S. Korea ministry Bone fragments recovered from the wreck of South Korea's Sewol ferry are from an animal and not human remains, the maritime ministry said Tuesday, dashing hopes of the relatives of missing victims. Authorities had earlier announced the pieces were human -- raising the prospect of closure for families of at least some of the nine passengers whose bodies were never found after the 2014 maritime disaster.


The Most Hated Man in Russia

The Most Hated Man in Russia This weekend's protests proved one thing: From Vladivostok to Kaliningrad, everyone hates Dmitry Medvedev.


China Southern, American Airlines announce tie-up

China Southern, American Airlines announce tie-up China Southern Airlines said Tuesday it would sell almost a one-tenth stake to American Airlines in a $200 million tie-up that could see two of the world's biggest carriers cooperate in a range of areas. American Airlines is the world's largest carrier by scheduled passengers carried, while China Southern is fourth globally and the biggest in Asia, according to the International Air Transport Association (IATA). The deal could give American a foot in the door of China's rapidly expanding air transport market, while China Southern said the move would support its own ambitions of expanding its global presence.


China Southern, American Airlines announce tie-up

China Southern, American Airlines announce tie-up China Southern Airlines said Tuesday it would sell almost a one-tenth stake to American Airlines in a $200 million tie-up that could see two of the world's biggest carriers cooperate in a range of areas. American Airlines is the world's largest carrier by scheduled passengers carried, while China Southern is fourth globally and the biggest in Asia, according to the International Air Transport Association (IATA). The deal could give American a foot in the door of China's rapidly expanding air transport market, while China Southern said the move would support its own ambitions of expanding its global presence.


Ahmed Kathrada, anti-apartheid activist and Mandela prison mate

Ahmed Kathrada, anti-apartheid activist and Mandela prison mate South Africa's anti-apartheid icon Ahmed Kathrada, who was jailed alongside Nelson Mandela, was feted as a humble liberation hero who shunned the power and glory that came with freedom. Unlike many struggle veterans, Kathrada, who was imprisoned on Robben Island, never held public political office after the fall of apartheid and Mandela's election as president in 1994. When Mandela left office in 1999, after serving a single four-year term, Kathrada also stepped away from politics -- immersing himself in activism through his Ahmed Kathrada Foundation.


Ahmed Kathrada, anti-apartheid activist and Mandela prison mate

Ahmed Kathrada, anti-apartheid activist and Mandela prison mate South Africa's anti-apartheid icon Ahmed Kathrada, who was jailed alongside Nelson Mandela, was feted as a humble liberation hero who shunned the power and glory that came with freedom. Unlike many struggle veterans, Kathrada, who was imprisoned on Robben Island, never held public political office after the fall of apartheid and Mandela's election as president in 1994. When Mandela left office in 1999, after serving a single four-year term, Kathrada also stepped away from politics -- immersing himself in activism through his Ahmed Kathrada Foundation.


Ahmed Kathrada, anti-apartheid activist and Mandela prison mate

Ahmed Kathrada, anti-apartheid activist and Mandela prison mate South Africa's anti-apartheid icon Ahmed Kathrada, who was jailed alongside Nelson Mandela, was feted as a humble liberation hero who shunned the power and glory that came with freedom. Unlike many struggle veterans, Kathrada, who was imprisoned on Robben Island, never held public political office after the fall of apartheid and Mandela's election as president in 1994. When Mandela left office in 1999, after serving a single four-year term, Kathrada also stepped away from politics -- immersing himself in activism through his Ahmed Kathrada Foundation.


Finger-pointing on Hill as GOP assesses health bill loss

Finger-pointing on Hill as GOP assesses health bill loss WASHINGTON (AP) — Congressional Republicans on Monday pointed fingers and assigned blame after their epic failure on health care and a weekend digesting the outcome.


Embattled Nunes Paralyzes House Intel Committee

Embattled Nunes Paralyzes House Intel Committee Congressman Jim Himes, a member of the House Intelligence Committee, talks with Rachel Maddow about how Committee Chairman Devin Nunes has not kept the committee updated on intelligence he talked with the media and White House about and more.


Did an astroid strike a Martian ocean and create a cataclysmic tsunami?

Did an astroid strike a Martian ocean and create a cataclysmic tsunami?

There's no shortage of theories about what Mars was like billions of years ago. The prevailing guess is that water was abundant, and there may have even been enough to form huge oceans. New research into an existing geographical feature on the red planet could provide new evidence of not only the existence of a massive body of water, but also an astroid impact that could have generated multiple devastating tsunamis.

Evidence that water existed on Mars is ample, and many researchers believe that telltale signs of tsunamis are also present. In an effort to explain how a tsunami might have been generated, scientists have been looking for the spot (or spots) on the Martian surface where an astroid or other celestial object could have come crashing down.

One particularly interesting spot on the planet, which NASA describes as "thumbprint-looking," was long thought to be the result of mud or other debris sliding downward after being pushed up by a glacier or other geographical shift. It's called the Lomonosov crater, and new research supports a very different theory as to how it got there.

Instead of being simply the result of gravity pulling dirt downhill, scientists now believe it could very well be the last remaining mark of an astroid that violently struck Mars billions of years ago. What's more, the characteristics of the crater support the idea that when the rock struck the planet, the spot it hit was actually an ocean, leading to multiple huge tidal waves as the displaced water was pushed from and pulled into resulting crater.


Did an astroid strike a Martian ocean and create a cataclysmic tsunami?

Did an astroid strike a Martian ocean and create a cataclysmic tsunami?

There's no shortage of theories about what Mars was like billions of years ago. The prevailing guess is that water was abundant, and there may have even been enough to form huge oceans. New research into an existing geographical feature on the red planet could provide new evidence of not only the existence of a massive body of water, but also an astroid impact that could have generated multiple devastating tsunamis.

Evidence that water existed on Mars is ample, and many researchers believe that telltale signs of tsunamis are also present. In an effort to explain how a tsunami might have been generated, scientists have been looking for the spot (or spots) on the Martian surface where an astroid or other celestial object could have come crashing down.

One particularly interesting spot on the planet, which NASA describes as "thumbprint-looking," was long thought to be the result of mud or other debris sliding downward after being pushed up by a glacier or other geographical shift. It's called the Lomonosov crater, and new research supports a very different theory as to how it got there.

Instead of being simply the result of gravity pulling dirt downhill, scientists now believe it could very well be the last remaining mark of an astroid that violently struck Mars billions of years ago. What's more, the characteristics of the crater support the idea that when the rock struck the planet, the spot it hit was actually an ocean, leading to multiple huge tidal waves as the displaced water was pushed from and pulled into resulting crater.


Did an astroid strike a Martian ocean and create a cataclysmic tsunami?

Did an astroid strike a Martian ocean and create a cataclysmic tsunami?

There's no shortage of theories about what Mars was like billions of years ago. The prevailing guess is that water was abundant, and there may have even been enough to form huge oceans. New research into an existing geographical feature on the red planet could provide new evidence of not only the existence of a massive body of water, but also an astroid impact that could have generated multiple devastating tsunamis.

Evidence that water existed on Mars is ample, and many researchers believe that telltale signs of tsunamis are also present. In an effort to explain how a tsunami might have been generated, scientists have been looking for the spot (or spots) on the Martian surface where an astroid or other celestial object could have come crashing down.

One particularly interesting spot on the planet, which NASA describes as "thumbprint-looking," was long thought to be the result of mud or other debris sliding downward after being pushed up by a glacier or other geographical shift. It's called the Lomonosov crater, and new research supports a very different theory as to how it got there.

Instead of being simply the result of gravity pulling dirt downhill, scientists now believe it could very well be the last remaining mark of an astroid that violently struck Mars billions of years ago. What's more, the characteristics of the crater support the idea that when the rock struck the planet, the spot it hit was actually an ocean, leading to multiple huge tidal waves as the displaced water was pushed from and pulled into resulting crater.


Wall Street's 'Fearless Girl' statue to stay until 2018

Wall Street's 'Fearless Girl' statue to stay until 2018 The popular bronze statue of a young girl staring down a bull on Wall Street will stay in place until March 2018, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Monday. Initially installed on March 7 for one week, the "Fearless Girl" sculpture appeared in media around the world, seen by many as a defiant symbol of women's rights under the new administration of President Donald Trump, who has bragged about sexually assaulting women. The exhibit of artist Kristen Visbal's work was first extended until April 2 and is now set to run until next year's International Women's Day on March 8.


Wall Street's 'Fearless Girl' statue to stay until 2018

Wall Street's 'Fearless Girl' statue to stay until 2018 The popular bronze statue of a young girl staring down a bull on Wall Street will stay in place until March 2018, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Monday. Initially installed on March 7 for one week, the "Fearless Girl" sculpture appeared in media around the world, seen by many as a defiant symbol of women's rights under the new administration of President Donald Trump, who has bragged about sexually assaulting women. The exhibit of artist Kristen Visbal's work was first extended until April 2 and is now set to run until next year's International Women's Day on March 8.


Wall Street's 'Fearless Girl' statue to stay until 2018

Wall Street's 'Fearless Girl' statue to stay until 2018 The popular bronze statue of a young girl staring down a bull on Wall Street will stay in place until March 2018, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Monday. Initially installed on March 7 for one week, the "Fearless Girl" sculpture appeared in media around the world, seen by many as a defiant symbol of women's rights under the new administration of President Donald Trump, who has bragged about sexually assaulting women. The exhibit of artist Kristen Visbal's work was first extended until April 2 and is now set to run until next year's International Women's Day on March 8.


The Latest: Bridge case defendants seek to avoid prison time

The Latest: Bridge case defendants seek to avoid prison time NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — The Latest on pre-sentencing court filings for two convicted ex-aides to Republican Gov. Chris Christie (all times local):


Slain Oklahoma officer was new recruit, aspiring canine cop

Slain Oklahoma officer was new recruit, aspiring canine cop TECUMSEH, Okla. (AP) — A 22-year-old officer and new recruit died Monday after a shootout with a man who fled a traffic stop in central Oklahoma, police said.


GOP failure in Congress boosts Medicaid effort in Kansas

GOP failure in Congress boosts Medicaid effort in Kansas TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — Legislators and advocates in Kansas pushing to expand the state's health coverage for the poor to thousands of adults are buoyed by the failure of Republicans in Washington to repeal former President Barack Obama's signature health care law.


GOP failure in Congress boosts Medicaid effort in Kansas

GOP failure in Congress boosts Medicaid effort in Kansas TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — Legislators and advocates in Kansas pushing to expand the state's health coverage for the poor to thousands of adults are buoyed by the failure of Republicans in Washington to repeal former President Barack Obama's signature health care law.


NASA just captured a photo of Jupiter that you won’t believe is real

NASA just captured a photo of Jupiter that you won’t believe is real

NASA has managed to capture some pretty stunning photos of all the cool stuff they've spotted over the years, and rarely does it fail to amaze. There's images of planet surfaces, the rings of Saturn, and even black holes flying through space totally unchecked. Rarely, however, does a photo look so unreal that at first glance you'd be likely to mistake it for a work of Earthling art. A new photo captured by NASA's Juno spacecraft falls into that category, and oh what a sight it is.

The image, originally taken by Juno's "JunoCam" camera, was taken in early February and shows Jupiter's ever-swirling mass of storm clouds from an altitude of roughly 9,000 miles. The storms which continually rock the planet take on a milky appearance when captured up close, and a citizen scientist named Roman Tkachenko took the liberty of enhancing the photo's colors to bring out even more of the defining lines and edges.

The Juno craft, packed with all kinds of fancy monitoring equipment, made its fifth flyby of the planet on Monday, which is also the fourth "science orbit," which is the name they give the flybys when all the instruments on board are up and running. The craft's next flyby won't happen until late May 2017, so it's a rare and exciting event when one of these close passes goes by without a hitch. The craft's data is currently being sent to Earth where researchers will continue to mine it for precious information about our solar system's most intimidating planet.


There’s a compelling new reason to buy your iPhone from T-Mobile

There’s a compelling new reason to buy your iPhone from T-Mobile

Choosing where to buy a new iPhone isn't as simple as it might seem. Third-party stores or carriers might give you a better monetary deal than buying an iPhone from the Apple Store, but you're also going to have to deal with yearly contracts, bill credits, or the hassle of unlocking the device if you switch networks.

But all the details aside, T-Mobile is hoping that its latest offering can make the decision much simpler. As of right now, if you buy an iPhone on T-Mobile and opt for extra device insurance, you'll also get AppleCare included in the price.

The AppleCare isn't free with all new iPhones from T-Mobile, but rather it's an additional service you get with T-Mobile's Premium Device Protection. That's just an insurance program that T-Mobile offers on devices. It runs $12 per month, and offers theft and loss protection on your phone. It's a good option if you're prone to losing your device altogether, but the deductibles are high, and it doesn't offer much help with common problems like a cracked screen or water damage (thanks to those high deductibles).

So T-Mobile's new offering bundles the normal insurance, offered by Assurant, with the Apple-provided AppleCare that you know and love. Assurant keeps covering theft and loss, while AppleCare gets you different benefits like live support, cheap screens, and battery repairs.

For anyone who was already on T-Mobile's insurance, or thinking about buying a phone protected by it, this is obviously good news. You're getting more coverage for the same amount of money, and knowing it's Apple-provided coverage means you're not going to have to spend weeks arguing with a weird third-party insurance company.

 


There’s a compelling new reason to buy your iPhone from T-Mobile

There’s a compelling new reason to buy your iPhone from T-Mobile

Choosing where to buy a new iPhone isn't as simple as it might seem. Third-party stores or carriers might give you a better monetary deal than buying an iPhone from the Apple Store, but you're also going to have to deal with yearly contracts, bill credits, or the hassle of unlocking the device if you switch networks.

But all the details aside, T-Mobile is hoping that its latest offering can make the decision much simpler. As of right now, if you buy an iPhone on T-Mobile and opt for extra device insurance, you'll also get AppleCare included in the price.

The AppleCare isn't free with all new iPhones from T-Mobile, but rather it's an additional service you get with T-Mobile's Premium Device Protection. That's just an insurance program that T-Mobile offers on devices. It runs $12 per month, and offers theft and loss protection on your phone. It's a good option if you're prone to losing your device altogether, but the deductibles are high, and it doesn't offer much help with common problems like a cracked screen or water damage (thanks to those high deductibles).

So T-Mobile's new offering bundles the normal insurance, offered by Assurant, with the Apple-provided AppleCare that you know and love. Assurant keeps covering theft and loss, while AppleCare gets you different benefits like live support, cheap screens, and battery repairs.

For anyone who was already on T-Mobile's insurance, or thinking about buying a phone protected by it, this is obviously good news. You're getting more coverage for the same amount of money, and knowing it's Apple-provided coverage means you're not going to have to spend weeks arguing with a weird third-party insurance company.

 


There’s a compelling new reason to buy your iPhone from T-Mobile

There’s a compelling new reason to buy your iPhone from T-Mobile

Choosing where to buy a new iPhone isn't as simple as it might seem. Third-party stores or carriers might give you a better monetary deal than buying an iPhone from the Apple Store, but you're also going to have to deal with yearly contracts, bill credits, or the hassle of unlocking the device if you switch networks.

But all the details aside, T-Mobile is hoping that its latest offering can make the decision much simpler. As of right now, if you buy an iPhone on T-Mobile and opt for extra device insurance, you'll also get AppleCare included in the price.

The AppleCare isn't free with all new iPhones from T-Mobile, but rather it's an additional service you get with T-Mobile's Premium Device Protection. That's just an insurance program that T-Mobile offers on devices. It runs $12 per month, and offers theft and loss protection on your phone. It's a good option if you're prone to losing your device altogether, but the deductibles are high, and it doesn't offer much help with common problems like a cracked screen or water damage (thanks to those high deductibles).

So T-Mobile's new offering bundles the normal insurance, offered by Assurant, with the Apple-provided AppleCare that you know and love. Assurant keeps covering theft and loss, while AppleCare gets you different benefits like live support, cheap screens, and battery repairs.

For anyone who was already on T-Mobile's insurance, or thinking about buying a phone protected by it, this is obviously good news. You're getting more coverage for the same amount of money, and knowing it's Apple-provided coverage means you're not going to have to spend weeks arguing with a weird third-party insurance company.

 


13 Places the Royals Like to Vacation

13 Places the Royals Like to Vacation From a castle in Scotland to the coast of Greece, here are thirteen places the royals like to vacation.