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Concerned by cyber threat, Obama seeks big increase in funding

By Dustin Volz and Mark Hosenball WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Barack Obama on Tuesday sought a surge in funding to counter cyber security threats, as his top intelligence official warned Congress that computer attacks were among the most imminent security challenges facing the United States. In his fiscal 2017 budget proposal, Obama asked for $19 billion for cyber security across the U.S. government, an increase of $5 billion over this year While the White House's overall fiscal plan faces tough going in the Republican-controlled Congress, increased cyber security funding has won bipartisan support of lawmakers in the past. The request comes as the Obama administration has struggled to address the growing risk posed by criminals and nation states in the digital world.

U.S. lawmakers seek to bar states from mandating encryption weaknesses

A lock icon, signifying an encrypted Internet connection, is seen on an Internet Explorer browser in Paris By Dustin Volz WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. House of Representatives lawmakers will introduce bipartisan legislation on Wednesday that would prohibit states from requiring tech companies to build encryption weaknesses into their products. The move marks the latest foray into an ongoing debate over encryption between Silicon Valley and Washington. While tech companies generally oppose weakened security standards, federal authorities have warned about a "going dark" phenomenon in which criminal suspects use powerful encryption in their communications so that investigators cannot access a phone's content, even with a warrant.


Michigan governor plans $360M for Flint, infrastructure

FILE-- In this Friday, Feb. 5, 2016 file photo, Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder is interviewed after visited a church that's distributing water and filters to its predominantly Latino parishioners in Flint, Mich. Snyder will propose spending $195 million more to address Flint’s water crisis and another $165 million updating infrastructure across the state in response to lead contamination overwhelming the city. The plan will be detailed in the Republican governor’s annual $54.9 billion budget presentation to the GOP-led Legislature on Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2016. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio, File) LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder is set to propose spending hundreds of millions more to address Flint's water crisis and to update infrastructure, including lead water pipes, in the city and across the state.


Michigan governor plans $360M for Flint, infrastructure

FILE-- In this Friday, Feb. 5, 2016 file photo, Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder is interviewed after visited a church that's distributing water and filters to its predominantly Latino parishioners in Flint, Mich. Snyder will propose spending $195 million more to address Flint’s water crisis and another $165 million updating infrastructure across the state in response to lead contamination overwhelming the city. The plan will be detailed in the Republican governor’s annual $54.9 billion budget presentation to the GOP-led Legislature on Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2016. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio, File) LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder is set to propose spending hundreds of millions more to address Flint's water crisis and to update infrastructure, including lead water pipes, in the city and across the state.


Hacker group just doxxed 22,000 FBI employees

Shortly after revealing the contact information of nearly 10,000 Department of Homeland Security employees, a group of hackers on Monday also published the contact information of more than 22,000 FBI employees. The leaked information, in addition to disclosing names and job titles, also includes employee phone numbers, states of residence, and email addresses. Notably, identifiable information of FBI employees from all areas of the bureau was compromised, including special agents, intelligence analysts, technicians, language specialists and more. DON'T MISS:  5 secret features hiding inside your iPhone The group behind the attack goes by the name DotGovs, with one member recently telling Motherboard that their most recent hack was carried out with rather elementary techniques. After obtaining the email credentials

Simple tips for making your Android phone more secure

Google knows Android has a reputation for not being the most secure platform around, which may be why it decided this week to help out Android users by posting a list of four essential tips for making their devices more secure. While some of these tips may be obvious for power users, they nonetheless contain some very useful information that newcomers to the platform should know. FROM EARLIER:  Ghostface Killah slaps ‘Pharma Bro’ Martin Shkreli silly, and it’s a thing of beauty First, Google says all Android users should buy all their apps through its official Google Play Store. The Play Store isn't perfect since we've seen plenty of shady apps get approved for sale on it in the past, but

Supreme Court blocks Obama carbon emissions plan

Steam rises from the stakes of the coal fired Jim Bridger Power Plant outside Point of the Rocks, Wyoming By Lawrence Hurley and Valerie Volcovici WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday delivered a major blow to President Barack Obama by putting on hold federal regulations to curb carbon dioxide emissions mainly from coal-fired power plants, the centerpiece of his administration's strategy to combat climate change. The court voted 5-4 along ideological lines to grant a request by 27 states and various companies and business groups to block the administration's Clean Power Plan, which also mandates a shift to renewable energy away from fossil fuels. The White House on Tuesday night said it disagrees with the court decision but said it expects the rule will survive the legal challenge.


Supreme Court blocks Obama carbon emissions plan

Steam rises from the stakes of the coal fired Jim Bridger Power Plant outside Point of the Rocks, Wyoming By Lawrence Hurley and Valerie Volcovici WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday delivered a major blow to President Barack Obama by putting on hold federal regulations to curb carbon dioxide emissions mainly from coal-fired power plants, the centerpiece of his administration's strategy to combat climate change. The court voted 5-4 along ideological lines to grant a request by 27 states and various companies and business groups to block the administration's Clean Power Plan, which also mandates a shift to renewable energy away from fossil fuels. The White House on Tuesday night said it disagrees with the court decision but said it expects the rule will survive the legal challenge.


Bergdahl case delayed over classified information dispute

U.S. Army Sergeant Bergdahl leaves the courthouse after an arraignment hearing for his court-martial in Fort Bragg A military appeals court halted proceedings against U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl on Tuesday while it considers a dispute over how much leeway the defense should have in accessing classified information.


Bergdahl case delayed over classified information dispute

U.S. Army Sergeant Bergdahl leaves the courthouse after an arraignment hearing for his court-martial in Fort Bragg A military appeals court halted proceedings against U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl on Tuesday while it considers a dispute over how much leeway the defense should have in accessing classified information.


Stop what you’re doing and download a password manager right now

Whether you know it or not, today is Safer Internet Day. That might sound like a silly, made up name for a random day in February, but rather than laugh it off, we might as well take the time we'd spend crafting some sarcastic tweet to actually make ourselves safer on the internet. There are plenty of ways to do that — let's focus on just one: Downloading a password manager. READ MORE:  How to get 2GB of free cloud storage from Google right now We talked about password managers just last week when The Wall Street Journal published a extensive piece about staying safe from hackers, but let's dive a little deeper into the subject for Safer Internet Day.

Akamai beats revenue estimates; unveils $1 billion share buyback plan

Online content distributor Akamai Technologies Inc reported better-than-expected quarterly revenue, helped by higher demand for its security services, and announced a $1 billion share buyback program. Akamai's shares rose 16 percent to $45.90 in after-hours trading on Tuesday. The upbeat results soothed investors' nerves after a selloff in the broader tech sector in the past few days, which was triggered by disappointing sales outlook from LinkedIn Corp and Tableau Software.

Obama seeks cybersecurity boost to replace 'ancient' tech

President Barack Obama meets with members of this national security team and cybersecurity advisers in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington,Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016. At right is Lisa Monaco, assistant to the president for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais) WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama said Tuesday he is asking Congress for $3.1 billion to update the government's archaic computer systems to protect them from cyberattacks as part of a new, centralized effort to boost cybersecurity.


Obama proposes $4.1 trillion spending plan in final White House budget

President Obama meets with his national security team in Washington By Jeff Mason and David Lawder WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. President Barack Obama proposed a $4.1 trillion spending plan for fiscal year 2017 on Tuesday in a final White House budget that met immediate Republican resistance for its cost and reliance on tax hikes to fund domestic priorities. Obama, a Democrat who leaves office next January, sought to outline his fiscal and political vision for the country with proposed investments in infrastructure, cyber security, education, and job growth. Paul Ryan, the Republican speaker of the House of Representatives, called it a "manual for growing the federal government at the expense of hardworking Americans." The budget envisions a deficit of $503 billion in fiscal 2017 after a $616 billion budget gap in the current fiscal year ending on Sept. 30.


Obama proposes $4.1 trillion spending plan in final White House budget

President Obama meets with his national security team in Washington By Jeff Mason and David Lawder WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. President Barack Obama proposed a $4.1 trillion spending plan for fiscal year 2017 on Tuesday in a final White House budget that met immediate Republican resistance for its cost and reliance on tax hikes to fund domestic priorities. Obama, a Democrat who leaves office next January, sought to outline his fiscal and political vision for the country with proposed investments in infrastructure, cyber security, education, and job growth. Paul Ryan, the Republican speaker of the House of Representatives, called it a "manual for growing the federal government at the expense of hardworking Americans." The budget envisions a deficit of $503 billion in fiscal 2017 after a $616 billion budget gap in the current fiscal year ending on Sept. 30.


Train crash in Germany kills at least 10, injures 80

BAD AIBLING, Germany (AP) — Crews using helicopters and boats rescued dozens of people from the wreckage of two German commuter trains that crashed head-on Tuesday in an isolated part of Bavaria, killing at least 10 and leaving authorities trying to determine why multiple safety measures failed.

Train crash in Germany kills at least 10, injures 80

BAD AIBLING, Germany (AP) — Crews using helicopters and boats rescued dozens of people from the wreckage of two German commuter trains that crashed head-on Tuesday in an isolated part of Bavaria, killing at least 10 and leaving authorities trying to determine why multiple safety measures failed.

Hackers are offering to pay $23,000 for valid Apple employee login details

Apple has a high regard for security and secrecy, but that doesn’t mean hackers have simply given up the dream of accessing this particular fortress. In fact, a new report says that in Ireland, hackers are ready to pay up to €20,000, or approximately $23,000, to Apple employees willing to sell their login details. DON’T MISS:  5 secret features hiding inside your iPhone "You'd be surprised how many people get on to us, just random Apple employees," a source told Business Insider . "You get emails offering you thousands [of euros] to get a password to get access to Apple. I could sell my Apple ID login information online

Here’s one iPhone lock screen security exploit you shouldn’t worry about

A newly discovered iPhone vulnerability can bypass your lockscreen code, but it will probably not affect you anytime soon. Security researcher Benjamin Kunz Mejri from Vulnerability Laboratory stumbled upon an authentication issue that affects iPhones and iPads running iOS 8 and iOS 9 . DON’T MISS: Fresh iPad Air 3 leak reveals more details about Apple's most exciting tablet in years Using this security hole, hackers could in theory access the data behind your lockscreen password. But in practice, the procedure is a little more complicated than that, as hackers would have to gain physical access to the iPhone or iPad in question. Furthermore, they would have to be able to manage an unlocked

US peacekeeping expert to coordinate sexual abuse response

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — Jane Holl Lute, a U.S. security expert who has held top posts in U.N. peacekeeping, was appointed by Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon on Monday to coordinate improvements in the United Nations' response to allegations of sexual exploitation and abuse by peacekeepers.

Justice, Homeland Security probe hack of U.S. agency employee data

By Mark Hosenball WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the Justice Department are investigating a claim that personal data related to thousands of DHS and FBI employees was hacked and has been posted online, an agency spokesman said on Monday. The tech website Motherboard reported on Sunday that a hacker, who Motherboard said wished to remain anonymous, intended to dump onto the Internet names, job titles, email addresses and official phone numbers of over 9,000 DHS employees and another 20,000 Federal Bureau of Investigation workers.

Awesome list of 17 ‘Breaking Bad’ references hidden in ‘Better Call Saul’

I'm not typically a fan of TV spinoffs, but Better Call Saul has seemingly broken the spinoff curse that plagues shows looking to capitalize off of the success of previous hits. To be sure, following up Breaking Bad would be a daunting task for any show, but Better Call Saul works precisely because it's not trying to perfectly mirror all the elements that made Vince Gilligan's meth-fueled drama so addictive and compelling. Rather, Better Call Saul seeks to carve out its own unique and independent nook within the larger Breaking Bad universe, and it does so quite successfully. DON'T MISS:  Intern caught sleeping on his second day of work gets trolled by the entire Internet At the same time,

Exclusive: Top cybercrime ring disrupted as authorities raid Moscow offices - sources

View of building which houses an office of 25 Floor Film Company in Moscow By Joseph Menn WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Russian authorities in November raided offices associated with a Moscow film distribution and production company as part of a crackdown on one of the world’s most notorious financial hacking operations, according to three sources with knowledge of the matter. Cybersecurity experts said a password-stealing software program known as Dyre — believed to be responsible for at least tens of millions of dollars in losses at financial institutions including Bank of America Corp and JPMorgan Chase & Co — has not been deployed since the time of the raid. Experts familiar with the situation said the case represents Russia’s biggest effort to date to crack down on cyber-crime.


Unhackable brain scans may some day replace passwords

Security breaches affecting millions of users have come to light in recent years, yet we’re no better at protecting our personal data, or at picking good passwords , than we were before. But some companies are already looking at new ways to secure customer data that go beyond passwords and PINs. Fingerprint sensors are found on more and more smartphones in recent years, and retina scanners are coming too. But in the future, we may have an even more advanced way of logging into online services and protecting our data: Brain scans. UP NEXT:  20 paid iPhone and iPad apps on sale for free right

Lawyer: New York-born man was mistreated after terror arrest

NEW YORK (AP) — The lawyer for a New York City-born man serving a 15-year prison sentence for supporting al-Qaida urged a judge Friday to find the U.S. government liable for failing to quickly diagnose a medical condition after his 2010 arrest, but a federal prosecutor said he was treated properly.

In Obama's final year, Senate is slow to act on his nominees

This April 17, 2014, photo, provided by the U.S. Army, shows then-Maj. Gen. John W. Nicholson, Jr. speaking to his senior leaders at Fort Bragg, N.C. If you wear combat fatigues to work, then your nomination is almost sure to sail through the Senate. If not, you’re likely in for a long wait. In just a week, senators confirmed Nicholson to be the next top American commander in Afghanistan. (Sgt. Mikki L. Sprenkle/U.S. Army via AP) WASHINGTON (AP) — If you wear combat fatigues to work, then your nomination is almost sure to sail through the Senate. If not, you're likely in for a long wait.


How to play the secret chess game hidden in Facebook Messenger

Hundreds of millions of people spend hours of their lives on Facebook every week, but there are some secrets that only a few of them have discovered. For example, last December, a member of the Chess subreddit community found a secret, playable chess game hidden in Facebook Messenger that anyone can play. READ MORE:  Follow these 5 steps to keep yourself safe from hackers In order to start a game, just open a Messenger conversation with a friend and type "@fbchess play" to begin. A chess board will suddenly appear in the chat box and the player with the white pieces moves first. But despite the fact that a visual representation of the board appears on screen, you'll have to

Follow these 5 steps to keep yourself safe from hackers

No matter how secure you think your devices are, someone could access your data if they put their mind to it. It's just the reality of the Information Age, but you should still do everything in your power to make yourself less of a target for hackers . DON'T MISS:  20 paid iPhone and iPad apps on sale for free right now In an extensive piece for The Wall Street Journal this week , Geoffrey A. Fowler laid out a five-step checklist that shouldn't take more than an hour to complete, and might be the difference between having your data stolen or not. Here are just a few of the most important steps you should take: First, update everything. Start with the operating

Rice aides, Powell got classified info on personal email accounts

Former U.S. Secretary of State Powell salutes the audience as he takes the stage at the Washington Ideas Forum in Washington By Mark Hosenball WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Former U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell and aides to his successor, Condoleezza Rice, both received classified information a handful of times via personal email accounts, the top Democrat on a congressional oversight panel said on Thursday. The findings come after nearly a year of controversy over Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton's decision to set up a private email server for her work as secretary of state. Representative Elijah Cummings said the disclosures about Powell's and Rice's aides' emails were made by the State Department's inspector general, who is reviewing the email practices of the last five secretaries of state.


Senators grill personnel office nominee over data hack

Beth Cobert, President Barack Obama's nominee to head the Office of Personnel Management (OPM), testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Feb. 4, 2016, before the Senate Homeland Security and Government Affairs Committee hearing on her nomination. Cobert promised to strengthen the agency’s cybersecurity and information technology systems after what’s believed to be the largest data breach in U.S. history. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta) WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama's nominee to head the Office of Personnel Management on Thursday promised to strengthen the agency's cybersecurity and information technology systems after what's believed to be the largest data breach in U.S. history.


Hackers attack 20 million accounts on Alibaba's Taobao shopping site

A logo of Alibaba Group is pictured at its headquarters in Hangzhou Hackers in China attempted to access over 20 million active accounts on Alibaba Group Holding Ltd's Taobao e-commerce website using Alibaba's own cloud computing service, according to a state media report posted on the Internet regulator's website. Analysts said the report from The Paper led to the price of Alibaba's U.S.-listed shares falling as much as 3.7 percent in late Wednesday trade.


Unpatched eBay vulnerability leaves shoppers at risk of downloading malware

Be extra careful the next time you visit a suspicious-looking eBay store page. According to Help Net Security , researchers from the Check Point security firm have discovered a vulnerability in the eBay platform that allows criminals to distribute malware by bypassing the site's code validation process and control the code themselves. MUST SEE:  15 paid iPhone apps on sale for free right now Here's how it works: an attacker sets up a store page with listings for products. On the page, a pop-up message will appear telling customers that they can receive a limited-time discount if they download the eBay mobile app. By clicking the

Apple ordered to pay $625 million in patent dispute with VirnetX

An Apple logo hangs above the entrance to the Apple store on 5th Avenue in the Manhattan borough of New York City Apple Inc must pay VirnetX Holding Corp more than $625 million for using the patent licensing company's Internet security technology without permission in its FaceTime and iMessage features, a federal jury in Texas said on Wednesday. The jury said Apple's infringement was willful. Apple was down 45 cents to $95.90 in after-hours trading.


Guilty plea in attempted cyber-attack on US govt. computers

WASHINGTON (AP) — A former Nuclear Regulatory Commission scientist pleaded guilty Tuesday to a federal computer crime, admitting that he attempted to launch a cyber-attack on government computers by sending employees emails that he thought contained a virus.

BT suffers temporary network problems

A BT logo is seen on a building in London Britain's BT Group said large numbers of its customers had lost connection to the Internet on Tuesday, but most were back online in a matter of hours and there were no indications that the failure was due to a malicious attack. "We've been working hard to fix the issue and are glad to report that nearly every customer affected is now reconnected, approximately two hours after the problem started," it said.


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