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'Violent tornado' tears through Jefferson City, Mo.: 'It’s a chaotic situation right now'

'Violent tornado' tears through Jefferson City, Mo.: 'It’s a chaotic situation right now' A violent tornado ripped through Jefferson City, Missouri, late Wednesday, leaving many trapped and others injured. More storms are forecast Thursday.


Tornados kill three in central US, damage Missouri state capital

Tornados kill three in central US, damage Missouri state capital Three people were killed in the small town of Golden City, Missouri, officials said, while the midwestern state's capital Jefferson City was struck by what the National Weather Service called a "large and destructive" tornado Wednesday night. The tornado caused significant damage, trapping people in buildings and homes, and knocking down power lines and trees. Rescue workers were checking door-to-door for survivors Thursday, some 20 people were injured and treated at hospitals overnight, and more injuries were expected, officials said.


Pompeo slams release of "American Taliban" as unconscionable: Fox

Pompeo slams release of "American Taliban" as unconscionable: Fox U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo criticized the pending release on Thursday of John Walker Lindh, the American captured in 2001 fighting for the Taliban, and said he believed the decision needed to be reviewed. "Unexplainable and unconscionable," Pompeo said in an interview with Fox News. Pompeo said Lindh "still is threatening the United states of America, still committed to the very jihad that he engaged in that killed a great American and a great CIA officer.


Florida to execute man convicted of abducting, killing eight women in 1984

Florida to execute man convicted of abducting, killing eight women in 1984 Robert Long is scheduled to die by lethal injection at 6 p.m. at the Florida State Prison in Raiford. Investigators said Long's crime spree began in the early 1980s when he answered ads for household goods for sale in local newspapers placed by women, went to their homes and sexually assaulted them. Authorities believe that Long, dubbed the "Classified Ad Rapist," used this tactic to rape dozens of women in California and Florida.


U.S. prosecutors weigh death penalty for accused Pittsburgh synagogue shooter

U.S. prosecutors weigh death penalty for accused Pittsburgh synagogue shooter The case of Robert Bowers, the man accused of massacring 11 people at Pittsburgh's Tree of Life synagogue last year was set to return to a federal courtroom on Thursday, as prosecutors weigh whether to pursue the death penalty against him. Bowers has pleaded not guilty in U.S. District Court in Pittsburgh to a 63-count indictment. Some of the charges, including murder as a hate crime, can carry the death penalty.


Swimming, s'mores and shots: Camps harden vaccine rules in U.S. measles outbreak

Swimming, s'mores and shots: Camps harden vaccine rules in U.S. measles outbreak As the United States battles its worst measles outbreak in 25 years, summer camps are tightening their policies on vaccines, with some prepared to turn away children whose parents opted not to vaccinate them against the disease. With more than 10 million American children attending summer day and overnight camps, camp owners and industry associations said they are urging parents to follow medical experts' advice to prevent their camps from becoming transmission sites for the highly contagious and sometimes deadly illness. Scott Rosmarin, whose family has operated Rosmarins Day Camp in Monroe, New York, for three generations, said he has already sent past camp families a letter warning that he will turn away longtime campers if their parents cite religious or philosophical objections to the vaccine.


Trump administration may use Iran threat to sell bombs to Saudis without Congress' approval: senator

Trump administration may use Iran threat to sell bombs to Saudis without Congress' approval: senator "I am hearing that Trump may use an obscure loophole in the Arms Control Act and notice a major new sale of bombs to Saudi Arabia (the ones they drop in Yemen) in a way that would prevent Congress from objecting. In this case, they said the Republican president would cite rising tensions with Iran as a reason to provide more military equipment to Saudi Arabia, which he sees as an important U.S. partner in the region. Trump has touted arms sales to the Saudis as a way to generate U.S. jobs.


The Latest: Tornadoes move through southwest Missouri towns

The Latest: Tornadoes move through southwest Missouri towns OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The Latest on storm damage in the Southern Plains and Midwest (all times local):


Taiwan's TSMC says chip shipments to Huawei not affected by U.S. ban

Taiwan's TSMC says chip shipments to Huawei not affected by U.S. ban TSMC, the world's biggest contract chipmaker, said on Thursday its shipments to China's Huawei Technologies Co Ltd are not affected by U.S. action aimed at curbing the telecom equipment maker's access to American technology. The comment was made by spokeswoman Elizabeth Sun at the TSMC 2019 Technology Symposium in Taiwan's tech hub of Hsinchu.


Texas environmentalists plan lawsuit against Valero for pollution

Texas environmentalists plan lawsuit against Valero for pollution Three Texas environmental groups notified Valero Energy Corp on Wednesday of plans to file a lawsuit under the U.S. Clean Air Act for pollution at the company's Port Arthur, Texas, refinery, the organizations said. Environment Texas, the Sierra Club and the Port Arthur Community Action Network allege over 600 violations of pollution limits by the release of hazardous chemicals like sulfur dioxide, hydrogen sulfide and particulates from the refinery since 2014.


Trump loses court round in U.S. Democratic lawmakers demand for bank documents on his businesses

Trump loses court round in U.S. Democratic lawmakers demand for bank documents on his businesses (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump, three of his children and the Trump Organization on Wednesday lost their bid to block Deutsche Bank AG and Capital One Financial Corp from providing financial records to Democratic lawmakers investigating Trump's businesses.


Trump antagonist Avenatti indicted for ripping off Stormy Daniels, extorting Nike

Trump antagonist Avenatti indicted for ripping off Stormy Daniels, extorting Nike The Nike indictment concerns charges announced in March that Avenatti tried to extort more than $20 million from the athletic wear company by threatening to expose what he called its improper payments to recruits for college basketball teams it sponsored. Avenatti also faces dozens of charges in southern California, where prosecutors on April 11 accused him of stealing millions of dollars from clients to pay for personal and business expenses, and lying to the Internal Revenue Service and a Mississippi bank about his finances. If convicted on all charges, Avenatti could face more than 400 years in prison, but would likely face a lesser punishment.


Trump administration holds off redirecting California's high-speed rail money

Trump administration holds off redirecting California's high-speed rail money In exchange, the state dropped its plans to ask a court to at least temporarily halt any planned shift in funds, California Governor Gavin Newsom's office said. On Tuesday, California sued in U.S. District Court in San Francisco to challenge the administration's decision to withhold $929 million awarded in 2010 for a "bullet" train project hobbled by extensive delays and rising costs. The lawsuit argued that President Donald Trump has "overt hostility to California" and its opposition to his initiative, so far unrealized, to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.


Pipeline opponents challenge Louisiana law targeting protesters

Pipeline opponents challenge Louisiana law targeting protesters Environmental groups and demonstrators arrested near an Energy Transfer LP crude pipeline filed a lawsuit on Wednesday challenging a 2018 Louisiana state law that made trespassing near oil and gas pipelines a criminal offense. Felony charges that carry sentences of up to five years in prison were brought last year against protesters and a journalist near the Dallas-based operator's Bayou Bridge pipeline, which was then under construction, according to the suit filed in U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Louisiana. After protests erupted near Energy Transfer's Dakota Access Pipeline and Bayou Bridge beginning in 2016, 18 states including Texas, Pennsylvania and South Dakota have introduced bills similar to the Louisiana law, according to the nonprofit Center for Constitutional Rights.


Navy SEAL's murder trial delayed over defense claims of prosecutor misconduct

Navy SEAL's murder trial delayed over defense claims of prosecutor misconduct A judge in the court-martial of a decorated Navy SEAL charged with war crimes in Iraq said on Wednesday the trial would start at least a few days late as lawyers on both sides grappled over allegations that prosecutors illegally snooped on the defense. The timing of the trial could be rendered moot in light of reports that President Donald Trump is considering offering a pardon to Special Operations Chief Edward Gallagher and other U.S. military personnel accused or convicted of battlefield atrocities. Gallagher is charged with fatally stabbing a helpless, wounded Islamic State fighter in his custody and with shooting two unarmed civilians - a school girl and an elderly man - from a sniper's perch during his 2017 deployment to Mosul, Iraq.


New Jersey man charged with threatening to bomb Trump Tower

New Jersey man charged with threatening to bomb Trump Tower Jonathan Xie, of Basking Ridge, was taken into custody on charges of attempting to provide material support to Hamas, the Islamist group that rules the Gaza Strip and which the United States designates as a terrorist organization, making false statements and transmitting threats over interstate commerce, according to federal prosecutors. "Homegrown violent extremists like Xie are a serious threat to national security,” U.S. Attorney Craig Carpenito said in a statement.


Google unveils a fresh new look for Search on mobile devices

Google unveils a fresh new look for Search on mobile devices Google unveiled a new look and feel today for the way it presents Google Search results on mobile, and the update has been regarded in a few corners now as somewhat News Feed-like.It's easy to see why that's the case, as the search giant's changes include putting emphasis on a website name and favicon above the search results. Whereas the source of results had previously not been so clearly emphasized, which makes the new design for showing results feel a little like scrolling through a feed of posts from publishers and the like."With this new design, a website's branding can be front and center, helping you better understand where the information is coming from and what pages have what you're looking for," explains Google Senior Interaction Designer for Search Jamie Leach in a company blog post today. "The name of the website and its icon appear at the top of the results card to help anchor each result, so you can more easily scan the page of results and decide what to explore next."The post notes that the refreshed look for what's arguably Google's most important product will start showing up to users over the coming days. As part of the changes, Leach continues, when you search for a product or service and Google feels like it's got a relevant, "useful" ad that would be worth including in the results, you'll now see an ad label in bold at the top of a search results card. The web address will also be included, so you can quickly determine where the information you're seeing is coming from.The other important thing to note about the Google Search refresh on mobile is that this also lays the foundation for Google to add more action buttons and information previews to search results cards, with Google wanting you to be able to now do everything from buying movie tickets to playing podcasts right there from within the results. "Our goal with Search always has been to help people quickly and easily find the information that they're looking for," Leach says. "Over the years, the amount and format of information available on the web has changed drastically -- from the proliferation of images and video to the availability of 3D objects you can now view in AR." Which is why the company thought a "visual refresh" of Search on mobile would do a better job of helping people find the information they need and quickly determine where it came from.


Pilot reports flash just before fatal mid-air Alaska plane collision

Pilot reports flash just before fatal mid-air Alaska plane collision The surviving pilot in last week's fatal mid-air plane collision in Alaska saw a flash just before the two planes collided with a "large, loud impact," according to a National Transportation Safety Board preliminary report issued on Wednesday. Six people died in the May 13 crash near Ketchikan, Alaska. The colliding planes, a De Havilland Otter operated by Ketchikan-based Taquan Air, and a De Havilland Beaver operated by Ketchikan-based Mountain Air Service, were ferrying cruise ship passengers back from a sightseeing trip to Misty Fjords National Monument in the Tongass National Forest.


House panel, Trump lawyers agree on appeals schedule in financial records case: statement

House panel, Trump lawyers agree on appeals schedule in financial records case: statement The House Oversight Committee has reached an agreement with President Donald Trump's attorneys to seek an expedited appeal in a court case in which lawmakers are seeking the U.S. leader's financial records from his accounting firm, the panel said in a statement on Wednesday. The panel said in a statement that under the schedule, written arguments could be submitted as early June 12, with briefings completed by July.


Judge rules against Trump, paves way for banks to provide his business records to Congress

Judge rules against Trump, paves way for banks to provide his business records to Congress U.S. President Donald Trump, three of his children and the Trump Organization on Wednesday lost their bid to block Deutsche Bank AG and Capital One Financial Corp from providing financial records to Democratic lawmakers investigating Trump's businesses. In a decision read from the bench after hearing arguments, U.S. District Judge Edgardo Ramos in New York said Congress has the legal authority to demand the records, clearing the way for the banks to comply with subpoenas issued to them by two U.S. House of Representatives committees last month.


Republican senator wants U.S. Census to ask about criminal records

Republican senator wants U.S. Census to ask about criminal records Senator Mike Lee of Utah suggested the idea at a hearing about the economic impact of the Census. It may add a new layer to a political battle over what questions the U.S. Census Bureau should include on its decennial survey of U.S. residents. "How many people are out of the labor force because of their criminal records?" Lee asked at a hearing in Washington by the Joint Economic Committee, which he chairs.


U.S. Treasury backs away from plan for Harriet Tubman on $20 bill next year

U.S. Treasury backs away from plan for Harriet Tubman on $20 bill next year In 2016, the Treasury Department said it would replace former President Andrew Jackson's image on the front of the bill with that of Tubman by 2020, along with redesigns of the $5 and $10 bill. President Donald Trump has called the inclusion of Tubman on the $20 bill an example of "pure political correctness." As a presidential candidate, Trump suggested Tubman would be better-suited for the $2 bill, a note that is not widely circulated. "We will meet the security feature redesign (goal) in 2020.


Trump loses court round in U.S. Democratic lawmakers demand for bank documents on his businesses

Trump loses court round in U.S. Democratic lawmakers demand for bank documents on his businesses (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump, three of his children and the Trump Organization on Wednesday lost their bid to block Deutsche Bank AG and Capital One Financial Corp from providing financial records to Democratic lawmakers investigating Trump's businesses. U.S. District Judge Edgardo Ramos ruled at a court hearing in New York that Congress has the legal authority to demand the records, clearing the way for the banks to comply with subpoenas issued to them by two U.S. House of Representatives committees last month. (Reporting by Brendan Pierson; editing by Grant McCool)


The Latest: Iran supreme leader critical of FM in nuke deal

The Latest: Iran supreme leader critical of FM in nuke deal TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — The Latest on increased tensions between the U.S. and Iran (all times local):


Trump torpedoes meeting with Democrats, blasts Pelosi's 'cover-up' accusation

Trump torpedoes meeting with Democrats, blasts Pelosi's 'cover-up' accusation President Donald Trump on Wednesday abruptly cut short a White House meeting with Democratic lawmakers on infrastructure, then ripped into them over House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's accusation that he is engaged in a cover-up and asserted that he could not work with them unless they dropped multiple investigations. The rupture bodes ill for any possible cooperation between the president and the Democrats who control the House of Representatives on legislation on infrastructure or other matters as Trump seeks re-election in 2020, signaling deepening political gridlock in Washington.


U.S. Navy SEAL appears in court for hearing in war crimes case

U.S. Navy SEAL appears in court for hearing in war crimes case A decorated Navy SEAL platoon leader charged with war crimes in Iraq appeared in a San Diego military court on Wednesday for a hearing focused on allegations by his attorneys that prosecutors engaged in illegal snooping on the defense team and journalists. The hearing comes less than a week before Special Operations Chief Edward Gallagher is scheduled to go on trial in a court-martial charging him with murdering a helpless, wounded Islamic State fighter in his custody and shooting unarmed civilians. Defense assertions that the Navy prosecutor, together with agents of the Naval Criminal Investigative Service and presiding judge, have engaged in wrongdoing could lead to a substantial delay in further proceedings.


Former U.S. Army soldier indicted for planning to bomb rally: Justice Department

Former U.S. Army soldier indicted for planning to bomb rally: Justice Department A U.S. combat veteran was indicted by a federal grand jury on Wednesday for allegedly planning to bomb a rally in Long Beach, California, last month, the Justice Department said. Mark Steven Domingo, 26, of Reseda, California, who served with the Army in Afghanistan, was arrested over the plot to bomb a white nationalist rally last month. The grand jury's indictment charged Domingo with providing material support to terrorists and attempted use of a weapon of mass destruction, the Justice Department said.


Pipeline opponents challenge Louisiana law targeting protesters

Pipeline opponents challenge Louisiana law targeting protesters Environmental groups and demonstrators arrested near an Energy Transfer LP crude pipeline filed a lawsuit on Wednesday challenging a 2018 Louisiana state law that made trespassing near oil and gas pipelines a criminal offense. Felony charges that carry sentences of up to five years in prison were brought last year against protesters and a journalist near the Dallas-based operator's Bayou Bridge pipeline, which was then under construction, according to the suit filed in U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Louisiana. After protests erupted near Energy Transfer's Dakota Access Pipeline and Bayou Bridge beginning in 2016, 18 states including Texas, Pennsylvania and South Dakota have introduced bills similar to the Louisiana law, according to the nonprofit Center for Constitutional Rights.


Rain, flooding expected in U.S. Southern Plains after deadly storms

Rain, flooding expected in U.S. Southern Plains after deadly storms Weather forecasters on Wednesday expected drenching rains to roll into the storm-ravaged U.S. southern and central states, where thunderstorms and tornadoes killed at least three people and triggered widespread flooding. More than 30 tornadoes struck a swath from Texas to Iowa since Monday, according to the National Weather Service, and residents in at least three Oklahoma riverfront communities were urged to evacuate due to flooding. One person was killed and another was injured when a tornado struck the rural town of Adair, Iowa, about 50 miles (80 km)west of Des Moines, at about 1:30 a.m. local time, the weather service said.


New York state legislature votes to make Trump tax returns available

New York state legislature votes to make Trump tax returns available New York state's legislature on Wednesday passed a bill that would make it easier for U.S. congressional committees investigating President Donald Trump to get access to his state tax returns. The Democratic-controlled state Assembly and Senate voted along party lines on the measure, which would circumvent his refusal to hand over his federal tax returns to Congress. New York Republicans who opposed the bill called it an abuse of power that fed into the political designs of Democrats in Washington, the Albany Times-Union reported.


Trump administration holds off redirecting California's high-speed rail money

Trump administration holds off redirecting California's high-speed rail money In exchange, the state dropped its plans to ask a court to at least temporarily halt any planned shift in funds, California Governor Gavin Newsom's office said. On Tuesday, California sued in U.S. District Court in San Francisco to challenge the administration's decision to withhold $929 million awarded in 2010 for a "bullet" train project hobbled by extensive delays and rising costs. The lawsuit argued that President Donald Trump has "overt hostility to California" and its opposition to his initiative, so far unrealized, to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.


'American Taliban' to be released from prison Thursday

'American Taliban' to be released from prison Thursday John Walker Lindh, the American captured in Afghanistan in 2001 fighting for the Taliban and vilified as a national traitor, is to be released early from a federal prison on Thursday while some U.S. lawmakers worry he still poses a security risk. Lindh, photographed as a wild-eyed, bearded 20-year-old at his capture, will leave a federal prison in Terre Haute, Indiana on probation after serving 17 years of a 20-year sentence, according to a prison official. Now 38, Lindh is among dozens of prisoners set to be released over the next few years after being captured in Iraq and Afghanistan by U.S. forces and convicted of terrorism-related crimes following the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks.


UPDATE 1-In latest blow to Britain's May, Leadsom resigns over new Brexit approach

UPDATE 1-In latest blow to Britain's May, Leadsom resigns over new Brexit approach Prominent Brexit supporter Andrea Leadsom resigned from British Prime Minister Theresa May's cabinet on Wednesday, saying she could no longer support the government's approach after May's latest gambit to pass her Brexit deal backfired. "I no longer believe that our approach will deliver on the referendum result," Leadsom, who served as Leader of the House of Commons, said in a resignation letter to May. May's new Brexit plan includes a vote on whether to hold a second Brexit referendum -- once her legislation passes the first stage -- as well as closer trading arrangements with the EU in future as incentives to lawmakers.


U.S. judge approves PG&E $105 million wildfire assistance fund

U.S. judge approves PG&E $105 million wildfire assistance fund PG&E Corp may set up a $105 million housing fund for victims of 2017 and 2018 wildfires in California, which set records for devastation and were blamed on the utility's equipment, the judge overseeing the investor-owned power producer's bankruptcy ruled on Wednesday. Creditors, which include wildfire victims, are fighting for funds as PG&E navigates bankruptcy stemming from the blazes and as the state plans for increasingly long and dangerous fire seasons its officials attribute to climate change. U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Dennis Montali at a hearing approved a motion by PG&E seeking permission to establish the fund for people who lost homes in the fires and were uninsured or have used up or will exhaust their insurance.


Virginia governor's role in blackface yearbook photo unclear, school says

Virginia governor's role in blackface yearbook photo unclear, school says Virginia Governor Ralph Northam's former medical school was unable to determine his role in a racist photograph that appeared on his 1984 yearbook page, according to a report released on Wednesday following a three-month inquiry. The photo sparked weeks of political chaos in the state after it was published by a conservative website in February, setting off scandals that embroiled Virginia's three top Democrats. It shows one person in blackface makeup and another in the robes of the white supremacist Ku Klux Klan.


Pelosi says Trump obstruction, cover-up could be impeachable offense

Pelosi says Trump obstruction, cover-up could be impeachable offense U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said on Wednesday President Donald Trump was engaged in obstruction of justice and a cover-up which could be an impeachable offense. "The fact is, in plain sight in the public domain, this president is obstructing justice and he's engaged in a cover-up - and that could be an impeachable offense," Pelosi said at an event sponsored by the Center for American Progress, a liberal policy advocacy group.


Pelosi says she prays for Trump after accusing him of cover-up

Pelosi says she prays for Trump after accusing him of cover-up U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said on Wednesday she prays for President Donald Trump after a meeting on infrastructure between Democratic congressional leaders and the president collapsed. "For some reason, maybe it was lack of confidence on his part, that he really couldn't ... match the greatness of the challenge that we have," Pelosi told reporters. "I pray for the president of the United States, and I pray for the United States of America," said Pelosi, who earlier in the day had accused Trump of engaging in a "cover-up" in stonewalling congressional probes stemming from the Mueller Russia investigation.


Trump accuses Democratic leaders of 'tearing the United States apart'

Trump accuses Democratic leaders of 'tearing the United States apart' WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump on Wednesday accused the top Democrats in Congress of "tearing the United States apart" by pursuing investigations stemming from the now-concluded Russia probe.


Democratic Rep. Tells Acting DHS Chief: Migrant Kid Deaths Under Your Watch Are ‘Intentional’

Democratic Rep. Tells Acting DHS Chief: Migrant Kid Deaths Under Your Watch Are ‘Intentional’ Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast/CSPANThe acting head of the Department of Homeland Security on Wednesday was accused of overseeing the “intentional” deaths of five migrant children, in an aggressive line of questioning by a Democratic member of the House Committee on Homeland Security. Rep. Lauren Underwood, an Illinois Democrat serving her first term, called the deaths the logical result of “a policy choice being made on purpose by this administration,” an assertion that Acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan disputed as “an appalling accusation.”McAleenan, who was first tapped to replace outgoing secretary Kirstjen Nielsen in April, previously served as commissioner of Customs and Border Protection, where he was an architect of the administration’s policy of separating migrant children from their families. That policy, Underwood said, as well as a spate of recent deaths of children in DHS custody, amounts to more than simple administrative negligence.“People keep dying, sir. People keep dying,” Underwood said at the conclusion of five minutes of aggressive questioning, disputing that overcrowding and lack of access to medical treatment at migrant detention facilities is the result of a lack of appropriations. “Congress has been more than willing to provide the resources and work with you to address the security and humanitarian concerns, but at this point, with five kids that have died, 5,000 separated from their families, I feel like—and the evidence is really clear—that this is intentional. It’s intentional.”DHS Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen Blames Migrant Girl’s Death in Border Patrol Custody on Her FamilyAs colleagues protested her characterization, Underwood continued, calling the deaths “a policy choice being made on purpose by this administration, and it’s cruel and inhumane.”McAleenan, who co-authored a memo to then-Secretary Nielsen asserting that Homeland Security could “direct the separation of parents or legal guardians and minors held in immigration detention so that the parent or legal guardian can be prosecuted,” protested Underwood’s remarks.“That’s an appalling accusation, and our men and women fight hard to protect people in our custody every single day,” said McAleenan, adding that Congress providing adequate resources “would have prevented this from happening.”Republican committee members—as well as one Democrat, Rep. Elissa Slotkin of Michigan—voted to strike Underwood’s remarks from the congressional record.On Monday, a 16-year-old Guatemalan boy became the fifth minor to die in U.S. government custody since December after being kept in a U.S. Customs and Border Protection detention facility for more than a week. Federal law requires minors to be held in Border Patrol stations, which are not equipped to house children or the infirm, for no longer than 72 hours.Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


U.S. measles outbreak spreads to Maine, 25th state to report case

U.S. measles outbreak spreads to Maine, 25th state to report case Maine became the 25th U.S. state to confirm a case of measles amid the country's worst outbreak of the disease in a quarter century, as state medical officials on Wednesday reported that a child was infected but is now fully recovered. The afflicted school-aged child from Somerset County, whose measles case was confirmed on Monday, was vaccinated and had no complications while the disease ran its course, the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention said. The report comes as measles cases have erupted across the country, with federal health officials reporting on Monday that 880 people have contracted the disease so far this year.